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Hiking

2022 Flower Gallery

In 2018 we began a tradition of posting a collection of the variety of flowers that we encountered during the years hikes. It’s always a bit shocking to see just how many different varieties we actually saw over the course of the year. It appears that the total in 2022 was right around 400. We are still learning to identify the flowers and are a long way from being able to tell some of the different species apart. For instance, we encounter species in both the genus Castilleja as well as Penstemon regularly but are not typically knowledgeable enough to determine which one we are seeing. That doesn’t take away from our ability to enjoy the flowers though, but the large number of different flowers makes it difficult if not impossible to get them all in one post.

With that in mind here are some (but not all) of the different flowers we saw this past year, in no particular order. (Any IDs provided are best guesses and any corrections or additional IDs are greatly appreciated.)

The first wildflower we spotted was a little violet on February 5th at the Yakona Nature Preserve.
Violet

It was certainly not the last violet we’d encounter as they are one of the more common flowers we see and also one that struggle to identify beyond “violet”.
Pioneer violetsMay 14th – Chehalem Ridge Nature Park

VioletsJune 15th – Donomore Meadows

VioletsJune 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Siskiyou Gap

Marsh violetMarsh violet, June 25th – Goat Marsh Lake

IMG_5305July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5566Wedgeleaf? violet – July 1st – Youngs Valley, Siskiyou Wilderness

Goosefoot violetGoosefoot? violet, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6593July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_9410August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness.

The final flower to be photographed was a bleeding heart enjoying a late season bloom along the Eagle Creek Trail on November 19th.
IMG_4739

Bleeding heartHere is a more photogenic bleeding heart from May 21st on the Kings Mountain Trail.

We were lucky enough to see a handful of bucket list flowers during our trips to Southern Oregon and Northern California.
20220618_084641Snow plant, June 18th – Red Buttes Wilderness

20220702_090623California lady slippers, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_100604(1)Bolander’s lily, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

Scarlet fritillaryScarlet fritillary, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Henderson's fawn lilyHenderson’s fawn lily, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Here are some of the other’s that we encountered over the course of the year.
Pungent desert parsleyPungent desert parsley, April 2nd -Balfour Trail

Columbia desert parsleyColumbia desert parsley, April 2nd – Klickitat Trail

Woodland-starsWoodland stars, April 2nd – Balfour Trail

Pacific hound,s tonguePacific hound’s tongue, April 2nd – Balfour Trail

LupineLupine, April 2nd – Klickitat Trail

Big-leaf mapleBig leaf maple, April 2nd – Klickitat Trail

Slender phloxSlender phlox, April 2nd – Klickitat Trail

FringecupFringecup, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

ButtercupsButtercups, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

CheckermallowCheckermallow, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

CheckermallowAnother checkermallow, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

IrisIris, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

PaintbrushA paintbrush, May 1st – Memaloose Hills

BalsamrootBalsamroot, May 1st – Memaloose Hills

Large-flower triteleiaLarge-flower triteleia, May 1st – Memaloose Hills

Naked broomrape and poison oakNaked broomrape, May 1st – Memaloose Hills

VetchVetch, May 1st – Moiser Plateau

Large-head cloverLarge-head clover, May 1st – Moiser Plateau

FiddleneckFiddleneck, May 1st – Moiser Plateau

Bachelor buttonBachelor button (non-native), May 1st – Moiser Plateau

Service berryService berry, May 7th – Orenco Woods

AvenAven, May 7th – Noble Woods

CamasCamas, May 7th – Miller Woods

GingerWild ginger, May 7th – Miller Woods

Striped coralrootStriped coralroot, May 7th – Miller Woods

Fairy slippersFairy slippers, May 7th – Miller Woods

PlectritisPlectritis, May 14th – Chehalem Ridge Nature Park

Fairy bells and bleeding heartFairy bells, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Snow queenSnow queen, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Red flowering currantRed flowering currant, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

TrilliumTrillium, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

MonkeyflowerA monkeyflower, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Chocolate lilyChocolate lily, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

KittentailsKittentails, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Glacier lilyGlacier lily, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Henderson's starsHenderson’s stars, May 25th – Mule Mountain

LarkspurLarkspur, May 25th – Mule Mountain

Possibly a popcorn flower (or a cryptantha)Not sure if this is a cryptantha or a popcorn flower, May 25th – Mule Mountain

Douglas' stitchwortDouglas’ stichwort, May 25th – Mule Mountain

Blue-eyed MaryA blue-eyed Mary, May 25th – Mule Mountain

California poppyCalifornia poppy, May 25th – Mule Mountain

ClarkiaA clarkia, May 25 – Mule Mountain

Hooker's Indian pinkHooker’s Indian pink, May 25th – Mule Mountain

StarflowerStar flower, May 25th – Mule Mountain

California ground coneCalifornia ground cone, May 25th – Mule Mountain

OokowOokow, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Blow wivesBlow wives, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Parry's hawkweed?Best guess is Parry’s hawkweed, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Clustered broomrapeClustered broomrape, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Narrowleaf onionNarrowleaf onion, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

California goldfieldCalifornia goldfield, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Possibly Fitch's tarweedPossibly Fitch’s tarweed, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Marigold pincushionplantMarigold pincushion plant, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Butterfly and beetles on Arrowleaf buckwheatArrowleaf buckwheat, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

ClarkiaA clarkia, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

IrisIris, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

MIlkvetchMilkvetch, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Wildflowers on Anderson ButteUnknown on Anderson Butte, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Giant white wakerobbinGiant white wakerobbin, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

LarkspurA larkspur, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Rough eyelashweedRough eyelashweed, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

WallflowerWallflower, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

OnionA wild onion, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Jacob's ladderJacob’s ladder, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Death camasDeath camas, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Common madiaCommon madia, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Common ViburnumCommon viburnum, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Hairy Indian paintbrush - Castilleja tenuisHairy Indian paintbrush, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

White campionWhite campion, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Pale flaxPale flax, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Purple oysterPurple oyster (non-native), May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

RoseRose, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

PeaPea, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Kellog's monkeyflowerKellog’s monkeyflower, May 29th – Applegate Lake

Heart-leaf milkweedHeart-leaf milkweed, May 29th – Applegate Lake

Northern phloxNorthern phlox, May 29th – Applegate Lake

LupineWhite lupine, May 29th – Applegate Lake

Carrotleaf horkeliaCarrotleaf horkelia, May 30th – Roxy Ann Peak

Blue-eyed grassBlue-eyed grass, May 30th – Roxy Ann Peak

BaneberryBaneberry, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

Star-flower solomonsealStar-flower solomonseal, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

False lily-of-the valleyFalse lily-of-the valley, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

CandyflowerCandyflower, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

Scouler's corydalisScouler’s corydalis, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

yellow glandweedYellow glandweed (non-native), June 11th – Julia Butler Hanson Wildlife Refuge

DaisyDaisy (non-native), June 11th – Julia Butler Hanson Wildlife Refuge

Flowering shrub at Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for Columbian White-tailed DeerUnknown shrub (non-native), June 11th – Julia Butler Hanson Wildlife Refuge

VetchA vetch or pea, June 13th – Susan Creek Falls Trail

ColumbineColumbine, June 13th – Susan Creek Falls Trail

SolomonsealSolomonseal, June 13th – North Umpqua Trail

ValerianValerian, June 13th – Lemolo Falls Trail

GooseberryGooseberry, June 14th – Illahee Rock

Blue-eyed MaryBlue-eyed Mary, June 14th – Illahee Rock

Fawn liliesFawn lilies, June 14th – Illahee Rock

PussytoesPussytoes, June 15th – Pacific Crest Trail near the Stateline Trailhead

BistortBistort, June 15th – Donomore Meadows

Cutleaf daisyCutleaf daisy, June 15th – Observation Peak

Lance-leaf Spring Beauty Claytonia lanceolataLance-leaf spring beauty, June 15th – Observation Peak

RockcressA rockcress, June 15th – Observation Peak

Alpine pennycressAlpine pennycress, June 15th – Observation Peak

Quill-leaf Lewisia Lewisia leeanaQuill-leaf lewisia, June 15th – Observation Peak

Marsh marigoldsMarsh marigold, June 15th – Pacific Crest Trail

AnemoneAnemone, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Siskiyou Gap

Jacob's ladderJacob’s ladder, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail

BudsBuds of an unknown flower, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Big Red Mountain

PaintbrushA paintbrush, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Big Red Mountain

Drummond's anemone along the PCTDrummond’s anemone, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Big Red Mountain

Ballhead waterleafBallhead waterleaf, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Big Red Mountain

Mariposa lilyA mariposa lily, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Siskiyou Gap

20220617_072919Diamond? clarkia, June 17th – Bandersnatch Trail

20220617_073325A honeysuckle, June 17th – Bandersnatch Trail

IMG_4315A catchfly, June 17th – Bandersnatch Trail

IMG_4343Blue-head gilia, June 17th – Red Queen Trail

20220617_093917Deerbrush, June 17th – Mike Uthoff Trail

20220617_094806Grand collomia, June 17th – Mike Uthoff Trail

IMG_4460A phaceli, June 17th – Mike Uthoff Trail

IMG_4589Rhododendron, June 18th – Frog Pond Trail

20220618_073810Pretty Face, June 18th – Frog Pond Trail

20220625_115233Believe this is some sort of saxifrage, June 25th – Toutle Trail

20220625_112218Avalanche lily, June 25th – Toutle Trail

IMG_5079A penstemon, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5080A phlox, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5163Lewis flax, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5173A paintbrush, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5203Nuttall’s sandwort?, July 1st -Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5220Queen’s cup, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5265Beargrass, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5277Shooting star, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

Wolley-head cloverWolley-head clover, July 1st – Siskiyou ikyWilderness

IMG_5354A nightshade, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220701_151859Siskiyou lewisia, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5562Spotted coralroot, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5565This tiny flower was at the edge of the meadow in Young’s Valley, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_065556Azalea, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5627Honeysuckle, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

Pacific ninebarkPacific ninebark, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

streambank bird's-foot trefoilStreambank bird’s-foot trefoil, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

White-vien wintergreenWhite-vein wintergreen, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_091852California pitcher-plant, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_094208Also California pitcher-plant, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_100311White-stemmed frasera, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5776Washington lily, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5809Phantom orchid, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5830Oregon sunshine, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5905Pussypaws, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6142Musk monkeyflower, July 3rd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6227Klamath arnica, July 3rd – Siskiyou Wilderness

White rushlilyWhite rushlily, July 3rd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6418Spirea, July 4th – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6423Wild onion, July 4th – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6434A penstemon, July 4th – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6483Phlox, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6490Brown’s peony, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6505Yet another paintbrush, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6583Silverleaf phacelia with visitor, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

Venus penstemonVenus penstemon, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_062027Douglas dustymaidens, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

IMG_6640Bog orchid, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_064506Mountain lady slippers, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_073039Rosy pussytoes, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_073735Yellow columbine, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

heart-leaved bittercressHeart-leaved bittercress?, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_092803Elephants head, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_112424Cone flower, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

IMG_6858Tall mountain bluebells, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220711_062416Another wild onion, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_062408Scarlet gilia, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_062801Arrowleaf groundsel, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_064029Purple sticky geranium, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_093724Ragged robin, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_063742False? sunflower, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_144805White mariposa lily, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220712_075029Rosy paintbrush, July 12th – Buck Creek Trail

Lyall's RockcressLyall’s rockcress, July 12th – Buck Creek Trail

20220713_063711Pacific coralroot, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

20220713_065301Hyssop, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

IMG_7753Another penstemon, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

IMG_7689Thistle, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

IMG_7723Oregon checker-mallow, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

Moneses uniflora - one-flowered monesesThis was a new one for us one-flowered moneses, July 14th – Bear Creek Trail

20220714_101502Pinedrop, July 14th – Bear Creek Trail

IMG_7988Sagebrush mariposa lily, July 14th – Wallowa Homeland

20220714_130643Blanket flower, July 14th – Wallowa Homeland

20220714_131056Yarrow, July 14th – Wallowa Homeland

IMG_8524Scouler’s bluebells, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8192Inside-out flower, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

Tiger lilyTiger lily, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8497Bluebells of Scotland, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8252Subalpine mariposa lily, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8303Western sweetvetch, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8335Coiled lousewort, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8353Best guess is subapline fleabane, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

20220723_120051Orange agoseris, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

20220723_130806A larkspur, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8526Mock orange, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8670Chicory (non-native), July 30th – E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area

IMG_8735Indian pipe, August 6th – Yasko Falls Trail

20220806_104434Leopard lily, August 6th – Hemlock Creek Trail

IMG_8874Mountain owl’s clover, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8879Rainiera, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8899Hedgenettle, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8905Large boykina, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8991Candy sticks, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8987Monkshood, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_9053Scarlet monkeyflower, August 7th – Fall Creek Falls Trail

IMG_9269White mountain heather, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9307Mountain heather, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9469Gentian, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9504False hellebore, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9409A saxifrage, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9622Beardstongue, August 20th – Grizzley Peak

Shasta knotweedShasta knotweed, August 22nd – Mt. Shasta Wilderness

marsh grass-of-ParnassusMarsh grass-of-Parnassus, August 22nd – Mt. Shasta Wilderness

IMG_9731Western pasque flower, August 22nd – Mt. Shasta Wilderness

20220823_074107Bigelow’s sneezeweed, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_9972Western snakeroot, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0020A buckwheat, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

Autumn dwarf gentian - Gentianella amarellaAutumn dwarf gentian, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0216Saffron-flowered lupine, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

20220823_121615An aster or fleabane, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

Hooded ladies tressesHooded ladies tresses, August 24th – Russian Wilderness

20220824_111610Can’t seem to identify this flower on the shore of Russian Lake, August 24th – Russian Wilderness

IMG_0528This one has me a bit stumped too, it looks like a wirelettuce or some sort of lewisa, August 24th – Russian Wilderness

IMG_0596Buckwheat, August 24th – Russian Wilderness

20220826_064654A monkeyflower (dwarf purple?), August 26th -Pacific Crest Trail near Carter Meadows Summit

20220826_080306Mountain coyote mint, August 26th – Pacific Crest Trail near Carter Meadows Summit

20220826_080417Sierra larkspur, August 26th – Pacific Crest Trail

IMG_0964Tasselflower brickellbush, August 26th – South Fork Lakes Trail

20220826_100503Monkeyflower, August 26th – South Fork Lakes Trail

IMG_1050Thistle, August 26th – South Fork Lakes Trail

20220826_103807California hairbells, August 26th – South Fork Lakes Trail

Common toadflaxCommon toadflax (non-native), September 10th – Spring Valley Greenway

IMG_1563Fireweed, September 17th – Union Peak Trail

IMG_1757Douglas spirea, September 18th – Sky Lakes Wilderness

Crater Lake Collomia?Best guess is Crater Lake collomia, September 19th – Dutton Creek Trail

20220925_092616Another mystery seen near the Cold Springs Trailhead, September 25th – Sky Lakes Wilderness

We have a few wildflower hikes planned in 2023. We are hoping to see at least one or two more that we haven’t before along with plenty of familiar faces. Happy Trails!

Categories
California Hiking Klamath Mountains Siskiyou mountains Trip report

Siskiyou Wilderness Day 2 – Devil’s Punchbowl 07/02/2022

Our first morning at Youngs Valley turned out to be rather exciting. Per usual I was up early (before 5am) and we were eating breakfast by 6am. We were sitting at the edge of the meadow away from camp enjoying our Mountain House biscuits and gravy when I spotted a black bear passing between some trees in the meadow. Heather had commented during our hike in the day before that we were due for a bear sighting and there it was. I think I said “that’s a bear” and then we watched as it entered a stand of trees around a large boulder in the meadow a little less than 100 yards from where we were.
IMG_5589There still wasn’t a lot of light in the valley but the bear was in with the tall tree in the middle of this picture.

We lost sight of it for a time and thought maybe it had continued on away from us behind the trees but then it reappeared as it scrounged for things to eat.
IMG_5591

We were downwind so I don’t think the bear realized we were there until it poked it’s head out of the trees and stared at us.
IMG_5594

We had stood up but hadn’t been making noise but now that we were spotted I let out a “HEY BEAR!” which in our past experience (12 bears on trail and 2 driving to trailheads) would have been enough to send the bear running, if it hadn’t already sped off when it first spotted us. This bear did head off but it was about as non-nonchalant as it could have been.
IMG_5595

IMG_5597Heather watching the bear leave through the gap in the trees.

We made sure that we really did have every bit of food that we weren’t taking with us for our day hike in our Ursack bear bags and secured them. Then we re-familiarized ourselves with our bear spray. I had been seeing alerts from the Forest Service about a rise in bear encounters due to a delay in the berry crop this year so we had at least come “Bear Aware“.

After the exciting breakfast we threw our packs for the day on and headed to the Clear Creek National Recreation Trail where we turned right off the old road bed at a small sign.
IMG_5600The sign for the Clear Creek Trail on a tree to the right.

From Youngs Valley it was 5.1 miles to the Doe Flat Trail then another 2.8 to our goal for the day, Devil’s Punchbowl, a lake in a granite bowl carved by glaciers. The Clear Creek Trail passed by a series of small meadows before entering a forest that had been spared by the recent fires.
IMG_5603

IMG_5607

IMG_5613Clear Creek below the trail.

A little under a mile and half from Youngs Valley we found ourselves back inside the scar of the 2018 Natchez Fire though.
IMG_5617

While there wasn’t much blowdown on the trail to navigate it was faint in places and overgrown with thimbleberry, trailing berries, currant and roses (those last three all have thorns) in places which made for some slow going.
IMG_5620Anemone and star flowers

IMG_5621

IMG_5625

IMG_5627Honeysuckle

IMG_5629Rocky Knob

IMG_5630One of several creek crossings. This one was a bit tricky to stay dry on but we both managed to do so on the first pass. Heather wasn’t so lucky on the way back though.

IMG_5631Rayless arnica

Pacific ninebarkPacific ninebark

20220702_075859Streambank bird’s-foot trefoil

IMG_5637Sign for the Rattlesnake Meadows Trail which looked to be in much worse shape than the Clear Creek Trail.

IMG_5649White-vein wintergreen

There were occasional pockets of green trees, typically near creeks.
IMG_5650

IMG_5652

IMG_5662Queens cup

IMG_5664

IMG_5665There was a small stream in the middle of the trees here.

About a mile and a half after entering the fire scar the trail left it again for a bit.
IMG_5668

20220702_090007A colorful pea.

The mornings second round of excitement came when we spotted the first of what turned out to be many California lady slippers.
IMG_5679

20220702_090645

These beautiful orchids found only in the Siskiyou Mountains of SW Oregon and northern California are endangered in part due to thoughtless people who pick or attempt to transplant the fragile plants. We took many, many photos.

Just under three and a half miles from Youngs Valley the trail came to a beautiful pool along Clear Creek. The pool was so nice that we failed to notice that the trail continued on the far side.
IMG_5683

IMG_5688

We took a break on the bank of the creek before continuing on and realizing that we needed to cross the creek. There was no way we were staying dry on this one so we forded the barely calf deep water. More excitement ensued when we came to the first of several patches of California pitcher plant – Darlingtonia californica.
IMG_5691

IMG_5695

IMG_5698

20220702_091852

This carnivorous plant native to northern California, SW Oregon and the Oregon Coast is considered uncommon and one we don’t often see. Many more pictures followed. We continued south along the trail hoping for more exciting sightings.
20220702_092025The western azaleas smelled wonderful.

IMG_5710Another side creek.

IMG_5714Another fire scar, this time from the 2017 Young fire.

Silver-spotted skipperSilver-spotted skipper

20220702_094208

20220702_094403

IMG_5741

20220702_094633

IMG_5752Chipmunk

IMG_5761White-stemmed frasera

20220702_100311

Bolander's lilyBolander’s lily, another exciting find for us and the first time we’ve seen them.

IMG_5770

IMG_5776Washington lily with a crab spider.

One and three quarters beyond the crossing we came to Trout Camp near the Doe Flat Trail junction where we saw the first signs of other humans since the people with the goats near the Black Butte Trailhead the day before. There was a hammock and a tent set up at a campsite there but we didn’t see any people.
IMG_5782Trail sign near Trout Camp.

Our original plan had been to move our tent here, hike up to Devil’s Punchbowl then take the Doe Flat Trail to Buck Lake before returning to the tent. Then in the morning we would pack up and move the tent back to Youngs Valley before hiking up to Raspberry Lake. After comparing Trout Camp to Youngs Valley we were happy that we’d changed our plan. It would have been fine but the scenery was a lot nicer at the meadow.

We left the Clear Creek Trail at Trout Camp and followed the Doe Flat Trail downhill to a crossing of Doe Creek where we once again got our feet wet.
IMG_5784Sign for the Doe Flat Trail at Trout Camp.

IMG_5793Doe Creek, we probably could have made it dry footed (I was able to on the way back.) but since we were already wet why bother.

We finally ran into people on the far side of Doe Creek. They were trying to get their bearings and we were able to point them in the direction of the Clear Creek Trail and Raspberry Lake where they were hoping to spend the night.

From Doe Creek the trail launched steeply uphill climbing via a series of switchbacks.
IMG_5794

IMG_5797

IMG_5799Twin Peaks in the distance.

IMG_5800Pacific coralroot

IMG_5809Phantom orchid

After a mile and over 700′ of elevation gain the trail appeared to be leveling out but it was also the junction with the Devil’s Punchbowl Trail.
IMG_5813The Doe Flat Trail continuing on from the junction.

The only sign at this junction was a small pointer for the trailhead and clear creek.
IMG_5814

Opposite the little sign the Devil’s Punchbowl Trail climbed steeply uphill behind a log that someone had scratched the trail name into.
IMG_5815

Another half mile and 600′ plus of elevation brought us to a viewpoint at a ridge end where we got our first good look into the granite basin where we would find Devil’s Punchbowl.
IMG_5817The flat top of Black Butte in the distance.

IMG_5821Bear Mountain

IMG_5827

At the ridge end we were just under 200′ below the elevation of Devil’s Punchbowl but after rounding the ridge the trail descended almost 150′ to a crossing of the lakes outlet creek.
IMG_5832Blue-head gilia

IMG_5830Oregon sunshine

IMG_5837

There was a nice pool below the crossing where we planned to refill our water on our way back by.
IMG_5839

Beyond the creek the trail became more of a scramble over the granite following occasional cairns over the rocky landscape.
IMG_5842

IMG_5844Buckwheat

IMG_5845Siskiyou lewisia

IMG_5850Preston Peak

IMG_5852

Before reaching Devil’s Punchbowl the trail passed a smaller but scenic lake.
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IMG_5871

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It was pretty obvious why this is the most popular spot in the wilderness and draws crowds. We however were fortunate enough to be the only people here when we arrived.
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It wasn’t long before another couple arrived followed by a pair of backpackers but we appreciated the solitude nonetheless.
IMG_5905Beetle on a pussypaw

IMG_5911Swallowtail on azalea

IMG_5917Silver-spotted skipper on Siskiyou lewisia

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After a nice long rest we headed back down stopping at the outlet creek for water.
IMG_5934There is a rock arch atop the ridge near the left hand side.

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IMG_5938Mountain heather

IMG_5941Green beetle

IMG_5953Ground squirrel

IMG_5960Clouds gathering around Preston Peak.

IMG_5963Fleabane near the pool.

IMG_5964Waterfall along the outlet creek.

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IMG_5973Clouds over Devil’s Punchbowl.

IMG_5978A duskywing

IMG_5979More clouds to the north.

We returned the way we’d come passing a number of groups heading up to Devil’s Punchbowl. We felt even more fortunate about having had the lake to ourselves for a bit. After recrossing Clear Creek we cooked our dinner at a small camp site before continuing on.
IMG_5992Bee in bindweed with a little ant observing.

IMG_6003Back at the ford.

IMG_6010Ouzel at the Clear Creek ford.

IMG_6022Doe in the forest.

IMG_6024This little guy had a pretty song.

IMG_6029Arriving back at Youngs Valley.

It was after 7:30pm and there was another couple setting up camp near ours and I stopped briefly to chat with them. When I started to continue down the road bed to our site I spotted what was probably the same bear from the morning standing on its hind legs watching us from the brush.
IMG_6030The bear in the middle of the photo behind a small leaning tree.

I gave another “HEY BEAR!” yell and he again moved on but a short while later when I was heading to re-secure the bear bags I ran into it again. This encounter was quite a bit closer but this time the bear hustled back into the brush. After securing the bags we put the rain fly up due to the increased presence of clouds. A little while later we heard our neighbor yell at the bear to run it off yet again. The bear hadn’t bothered our camp and there was no evidence that it had tried to get to our food and it was too late and we were too tired to move camp. We kept the bear spray and a whistle close at hand and turned in for the night.

With some side trips and wandering the GPS registered a 16.5 mile day with just over 4000′ of cumulative elevation gain.

Day 2 track in Magenta

It was an exciting day for sure but also another tough one. We were looking forward to a shorter day on Sunday followed by a 5.5 mile hike back to the trailhead on the 4th. Happy Trails!

Flickr: Devil’s Punchbowl

Categories
Hiking Klamath/Siskiyou Mountains Oregon Trip report

Kalmiopsis Wilderness and Redwoods Nature Trail

Tuesday of our vacation week brought us our longest drive from Gold Beach to the Kalmiopsis Wilderness. We had a pair of hikes planned there followed by a quick stop on the way back at Alfred Loeb State Park to see some redwoods.

Our first stop was the Vulcan Peak Trailhead. To reach this trailhead we drove to Brookings and took North Bank Road along the Chetco River for 16 miles to a T shaped junction with gravel Forest Service Road 1909. We turned right following signs for the wilderness and began a tedious 13.3 mile drive. This wasn’t the worst road we’ve been on but it was arguably the longest stretch of bad road we’ve encountered. It took over 45 minutes to reach the trailhead on a short spur road with an outhouse.

For the first mile we were actually on the Chetco Divide Trail as it followed an old roadbed along a ridge surrounded by forest burnt in the massive 2002 Biscuit Fire.
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At the 1 mile mark the Vulcan Peak Trail split off heading uphill while the Chetco Divide Trail veered to the right.
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Shortly after leaving the Chetco Divide Trail we entered the Kalmiopsis Wilderness.
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It was pretty windy along the exposed ridge but it was shaping up to be a beautiful day.
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The area reminded us of our trip to the Red Buttes Wilderness last October only here it was Spring and there were plenty of wildflowers.
Death Camas
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Tolmie’s mariposa lily
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Wild iris
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A paintbrush
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Wallflower
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Sand Dune Phacelia
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Arnica
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Wedgeleaf violet
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Dwarf ceanothus
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The trail wound its way up the hillsides before reaching a saddle with a nice view south to Preston Peak and the Siskiyou Mountains.
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The trail then headed north to the summit of Vulcan Peak.
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We followed the summit ridge north to a view of Little Vulcan Lake (one of our destinations on our next hike).
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We declared victory there although the ridge continued on and would have eventually provided a view down to Vulcan Lake as well.

Our next trailhead was another 1.7 miles along road 1909. The final mile of this section made the first 13.3 seem like a nice country road. The trail began at a signboard where the road was blocked by some dirt mounds.
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A short distance from the signboard the trail split. We took the right-hand fork uphill toward Vulcan Lake.
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The lakes were on the other side of a ridge so we followed the trail up to a saddle with a view of both lakes and Vulcan Peak.
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Vulcan Lake
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Between the rocky terrain and the 2002 fire the trail grew fainter as we neared the lakes. Rock cairns helped mark the way though.
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Vulcan Lake quickly ranked as one of our favorites. The colors of the water and surrounding rocks were amazing and lizards scurried along the shore while newts swam by in lake.
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The water was cool but not cold and we sat on the rocky bank soaking in the scenery. We could have easily spent hours or even days there but we had other places to visit so we eventually pulled ourselves away and continued to Little Vulcan Lake.

To reach Little Vulcan Lake we located a trail sign for the Gardner Mine Loop near where we had left the main trail to go down to Vulcan Lake.
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From there we could see another trail sign for the Trail 1110B.
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Two tenths of a mile following more cairns and faint tread brought us to Little Vulcan Lake. As close as these two lakes were to one another they couldn’t have been much different.
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Instead of red rock surrounding the water here we found Darlingtonia californica. Insect eating pitcher plants.
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This was our first time seeing the pitcher plants and we found them to be really interesting. In addition to the pitcher plants there were a number of newts in the lake.

Six newts in Little Vulcan Lake.
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From Little Vulcan Lake we returned to the Gardner Mine Loop trail and followed it as well as we could. Between cairns and our GPS we managed to stay mostly on course despite almost no sign of the actual trail tread.
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We followed the cairns for .6 miles being eyed by lizards the whole time.
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After the .6 miles of cairns we arrived at Sorvaag Bog.
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From the bog the trail followed an old roadbed making it easier to follow. We passed the entrance to the Gardner Mine before reaching a junction in a saddle with the Johnson Butte Trail.
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This junction was just .8 miles from where the trail had split and we’d taken the right-hand fork to Vulcan Lake. Before heading back though we had one final lake to visit and some rare flowers to look for so we turned right and headed deeper into the wilderness.

We were hoping to see some kalmiopsis leachiana in bloom. This rare flowering plant is found only in a few areas in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness. We knew that there were some along the Johnson Butte Trail so we were keeping an eye out only we weren’t entirely certain what they looked like. For some reason we hadn’t looked at any pictures online beforehand so the only information we had was the general areas we might spot them in and a belief that they were pink.

The Johnson Butte Trail followed another old road for 2.6 miles then turned to a simple trail. The whole time the trail alternated between ridges and hillsides often switching between the east and west facing sides at saddles.
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There were plenty of flowers along the way including a surprise appearance of a single beargrass blooming.
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Wild Rose
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Wild iris
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Narrowleaf blue eyed mary
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Starflower
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Rhododendron
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Tolmie’s mariposa lily
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We began seeing some pink flowers that we at first mistook for mountain heather, but after looking at them closer we realized they were something different. We eventually convinced ourselves that these must be the kalmiopsis leachiana which was confirmed later when we double checked online.
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The best patches were found after the trail made a sharp right turn at a ridge end below Dry Butte.
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A few other flowers we had not been seeing were found below Dry Butte.
Bleeding heart
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Red flowering currant
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Penstemon and solomonseal
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A little over three miles from the saddle where we had set off on the Johnson Butte Trail we found a sign for the Salamander Lake Trail.
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There was a campsite just below the ridge but the lake was further downhill hidden by brush and trees. The trail disappeared in the same brush and trees at the campsite and we momentarily considered not picking our way down to the lake, but that had been our planned turnaround point so down we went. We fought our way steeply down through the brush and blowdown to find the little lily pad filled Salamander Lake.
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After the Vulcan Lakes this one was a bit of a letdown but we found some shade along the bank and took a short break that was interrupted by a few mosquitoes. We climbed back up to the Johnson Butte Trail and returned the way we’d come. At the saddle junction we kept straight following the trail along the old roadbed the .8 miles back to where we’d split off earlier and then completed the short walk to the trailhead.
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It had been a very warm sunny day and we were pretty worn out when we started the drive back out along road 1909. It was nice to rest in the car for a bit as we slowly made our way back to North Bank Road. Once we were back on North Bank Road we drove 8.5 miles towards Brookings where we turned into Alfred Loeb State Park for our final hike of the day. The temperature gauge in the car read 87 as we pulled in.

We parked at a signed trailhead and took the .7 mile River View Trail.
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This trail passed through a forest following the Chetco River. Lettered signposts corresponded to entries in a brochure that could be picked up at the trailhead.
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The Riverview Trail led to a crossing of North Bank Road where the Redwood Nature Trail began on the far side.
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This 1.2 mile loop trail passed through a mixed forest with some nice redwoods along the way.
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We did the loop in a counter-clockwise direction which seemed to leave the steeper sections as downhill. After finishing the loop and returning to the car we walked down to the Chetco River because there really hadn’t been a great view of it along the River View Trail.
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When it was all said and done our GPS showed a total of 16.6 miles for the three hikes. Three miles for Vulcan Peak, 10.7 for Vulcan and Salamander Lakes, and 2.9 for this final hike. It had been a long hot day and we decided that ice cream sounded good for dinner so we stopped at the DQ in Brookings splitting a chicken strip basket and each having a Blizzard. Such are the joys of being on vacation. Happy Trails!

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/9319235@N02/albums/72157668642744636