Categories
Hiking Year-end wrap up

2022 Wildlife Gallery Part 2 – Featherless Friends

This year we split our wildlife gallery into two posts starting with our feather friends (post). We now move on to our featherless friends which ranged from tiny ants to bull elk and an almost too friendly black bear. It was an especially good year for deer including several encounters with does and fawns.

We’ll start out small and work our way up to the larger mammals.
IMG_6653Ants dropping sawdust from a log along the Catherine Creek Trail. We sat and watched these busy ants for quite a while. They had created a good-sized pile on the ground below.

Lady bugs on Observation PeakWe see a lot of beetles but usually not all at once like these lady bugs on Observation Peak.

LadybugLady bug – Upper Table Rock

Beetle on a California poppyYellow & black beetle – Mule Mountain

IMG_5905Redish brown beetle – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5941Green beetle – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6578Hitchhiker – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6831Blueish green beetle – Catherine Creek Meadows

IMG_6836Small beetle – Catherine Creek Meadows

20220711_064348Green beetle on a geranium – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_8377Green beetle on a wallflower – Silver Star Mountain

IMG_1487Stripped beetle – Spring Valley Greenway

Water skippers on Big Twin LakeWater skippers – Big Twin Lake

IMG_6019Spider on thimbleberry – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6708Crab spider – Eagle Cap Wilderness

20220714_094414Another crab spider – Eagle Cap Wilderness

20220824_144345Cricket – Pacific Crest Trail

20220824_140037We are often literally struck by grasshoppers as we hike. Sometimes they stick when they hit us such as this one along the PCT.

Bee on phaceliaBee on phacelia – Mule Mountain

Wet bumblebee on lupineWet bee on lupine – Julia Butler Hanson Wildlife Refuge

IMG_8781Bumble bee – Hemlock Creek Trail

IMG_9449Lots of pollen – Mt. Adams Wilderness

Marsh marigold with a visitorBee landing on a marsh marigold along the PCT

IMG_5329Bee approaching penstemon – Siskiyou Wilderness

Bee and ant in bindweedBee and a tiny ant in a bindweed – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_7688Insects on thistle – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_7600Wasp? – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_8429Some sort of wasp – Silver Star Mountain

IMG_7791Insect along Bear Creek – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_0149My brother and I used to call these “weird things”; I have no idea what it actually is – Trinity Alps Wilderness

Damsel flyDamsel fly – Denman Wildlife Area

IMG_8876Damsel fly – Hemlock Lake

IMG_4843Dragon fly – Goat Marsh Lake

IMG_5430Dragon fly – Siskiyou Wilderness

Dragon flyDragon fly – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_7975Dragon fly – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_8117Dragon fly along the Wallowa River – Wallowa Homeland

IMG_8716Dragon fly – E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area

IMG_8871Dragon fly – Hemlock Lake

IMG_2635Dragon fly – Sky Lakes Wilderness

Snail on the Rock Creek TrailSnail – Rock Creek Trail

Snail on the Payette TrailSnail – Applegate Lake

SnailSnail – North Siouxon Trail

SnailSnail – Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge

IMG_6043Snail – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_2814Snail – Cascade Head

IMG_3254Slug – Larch Mountain Trail

Slug on a flowerSlug (and a fly) – Susan Creek Trail

IMG_1364Slug – Fish Lake

Slug on lupineSlug on lupine – Julia Butler Hansen Wildlife Refuge

Slug and an unfortunate earth wormSlug and an unfortunate earth worm – Rock Creek Trail

Worms on the trailWorms – Chehalem Ridge Nature Park

MillipedeMillipede – North Siouxon Trail

MillipedeMillipede – Rock Creek Trail

Milli or centipedeMillipede – Illahee Rock

MillipedeMillipede – Eagle Cap Wilderness

Woolly bear caterpillarWet caterpillar – Yakona Nature Preserve

IMG_3245Dry version – Larch Mountain Trail

CaterpillarCaterpillar – Julia Butler Hansen Wildlife Refuge

IMG_5393Caterpillar – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5584Caterpillar – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_3169Caterpillar – Larch Mountain Trail

IMG_3240Caterpillar – Larch Mountain Trail

IMG_3243Caterpillar – Larch Mountain Trail

Moth?Moth – Klickitat Trail

IMG_7092Moth -Eagle Cap Wilderness

MothMoth – Twin Lakes

IMG_6645Moth – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_7670Moth – Eagle Cap Wilderness

20220714_094512Moth – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_9093Moth – Wolf Creek Falls Trail

IMG_3002Moth – Cascade Head

Propertius duskywing - Erynnis propertiusPropertius duskywing (Erynnis propertius) – Klickitat Trail

IMG_5978Duskywing – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5374Northern Cloudywing? – Siskiyou Wilderness

Silver-spotted skipperSilver-spotted skipper – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_9637Skipper – Grizzly Peak

IMG_1233Skipper – Rogue-Umpqua Divide Wilderness

IMG_8702Skipper – E. E. Wilson Wildlife Area

A hairstreakHairstreak (bramble?) – Siskiyou Mountains

IMG_5289Cedar hairstreak – Siskiyou Wilderness

Thicket Hairstreak?Hairstreak (possibly thicket) – Eagle Cap Wilderness

Ochre ringlet on fiddleneckOchre ringlet – Jack Ash Trail

IMG_5972Butterfly – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_0779Butterfly – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0813Butterfly – Trinity Alps Wilderness

Butterfly on buckwheatButterfly – Upper Table Rock

Butterfly on scatButterfly – Mule Mountain

IMG_7644Butterfly – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_6852Butterfly – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_9401Butterfly – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9455Butterfly – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_6555Butterfly – Mt. Ireland

IMG_0243Butterfly – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_8481Butterfly – Silver Star Mountain

IMG_0333Butterfly – Russian Wilderness

IMG_0185Butterfly – Trinity Alps Wilderness

Sara's orangetipSara’s orangetip – Klickitat Trail

IMG_8677Common woodnymph – E. E. Wilson Wildlife Area

IMG_1256Another woodnymph – Rogue-Umpqua Divide Wilderness

IMG_5133Orange sulphur – Siskiyou Wilderness

Mountain ParnassianMountain parnassian – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_8937Clodius parnassian – Hemlock Lake

20220712_102723Western white? – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_0926Western white – Trinty Alps Wilderness

20220824_134541Pine white – Russian Wilderness

IMG_6882Butterfly – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_0311Butterfly – Russian Wilderness

IMG_9418Butterfly – Mt. Adams Wilderness

Possibly a northern checkerspotButterfly – Mule Mountain

IMG_8310Butterfly – Silver Star Mountain

IMG_8508Butterfly – Silver Star Mountain

IMG_8445Butterfly – Silver Star Mountain

IMG_8364Western meadow fritillary? – Silver Star Mountain

IMG_8450A fritillary – Silver Star Mountain

IMG_0210A fritillary – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0342A fritillary -Russian Wilderness

IMG_1193A fritillary – Rogue-Umpqua Divide Wilderness

Mourning cloakMourning cloak – Klickitat Trail

IMG_5152California tortoiseshell – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6900Milbert’s tortoiseshell – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_7654Lorquin’s admiral – Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_9704Common buckeye – Mt. Shasta Wilderness

IMG_2417Hoary comma – Sky Lakes Wilderness

Green comma?Green comma? – Eagle Cap Wilderness

Swallowtails:
Anise swallowtailKlickitat Trail

SwallowtailJulia Butler Hanson Wildlife Refuge

IMG_8127Eagle Cap Wilderness

IMG_0394Tadpoles – Russian Wilderness

IMG_9385Tadpole transforming – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_0479Frog – Russian Wilderness

IMG_4761Frog – Goat Marsh Lake

IMG_5227Tree frog – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_0169Frog – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0171Toad – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_9667Toad – Mt. Jefferson Wilderness

IMG_0354Fish – Siphon Lake

Rough skinned newtRough skinned newt – Yakona Nature Preserve

Western painted turtleWestern painted turtle – Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge

Garter snakeBaby snake – Miller Woods

Garter snakeGarter snake – Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge

LizardLizard – Mule Mountain

LizardLizard – Upper Table Rock

IMG_0585Lizard – Russian Wilderness

IMG_5200Lizard – Siskiyou Wilderness

LizardLizard – Klickitat Trail

LizardLizard – Upper Table Rock

Alligator lizardAlligator lizard – Mule Mountain

ChipmunkChipmunk – Observation Peak

IMG_0470Ground squirrel – Russian Wilderness

Ground squirrelGround squirrel – Klickitat Trail

IMG_7344Ground squirrel – Eagle Cap Wilderness

Ground squirrelGround squirrel – Upper Table Rock

SquirrelSquirrel – Rock Creek Trail

SquirrelSquirrel – Twin Lakes

IMG_3250Squirrel – Larch Mountain Trail

IMG_7945Marmot – Wallowa Homeland

Jack rabbitJack rabbit – Denman Wildlife Area

IMG_8674Rabbit – E. E. Wilson Wildlife Area

IMG_8461Pika – Silver Star Mountain

MuskratMuskrat – Julia Butler Hansen – Wildlife Refuge

Otter at Killin WetlandsOtter – Killin Wetlands

IMG_2902Sea lion – Hart’s Cove

DeerDeer – Memaloose Hills

DoeDoe – Miller Woods

DoeMamma – Roxy Ann Peak

FawnFawn – Roxy Ann Peak

Columbain white-tailed buckColumbian white-tailed buck – Julia Butler Hansen Wildlife Refuge

Doe and fawn in Donomore MeadowsDoe & fawn – Donomore Meadows

IMG_5571Three bucks – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6285Buck – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_0197Buck – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0384Doe & fawn – Russian Wilderness

IMG_0496Buck and does – Russian Wilderness

IMG_1923Two bucks – Crater Lake National Park

Elk on Road 200Elk – Yakona Nature Preserve

Bull elk at Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for Columbian White-tailed DeerBull elk – Julia Butler Hansen Wildlife Refuge

Mountain goat below the Mt. Ireland LookoutMountain goat below the Mt. Ireland Lookout – Mt. Ireland

Goat on the other side of Highway 4Domestic goat – Near the Julia Butler Hansen Wildlife Refuge

IMG_6302Black bear – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5594The same black bear making eye contact the day before.

Categories
Hiking Year-end wrap up

2022 Wildlife Gallery Part 1 – Feathered Friends

We thought we’d do something different this year and split our 2022 wildlife gallery into two posts to keep them a little shorter. It made the most sense to us to do a post with the different birds we saw during 2022 and then one of the other wildlife. As with our wildflower post any corrections or additions to our attempts at identifying what we’ve photographed is greatly appreciated. One last note, while we really enjoy taking pictures as a way to record what we see on our hikes, we are by no means photographers. We use our phones and a point and shoot camera on the auto setting, so the pictures are far from professional, but we hope you enjoy them.

We’ll start small which, aside from some of the raptors, is where we have the most difficulty identifying the various species (ducks and sea birds can be tricky too).
HummingbirdHummingbird at Memaloose Hills in May.

HummingbirdHummingbird at Upper Table Rock in May.

Black capped chickadeeBlack capped chickadee at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Yellow-rumped warbler (Audubon's)Yellow-rumped warbler (Audubon’s) at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Marsh wrenWren (marsh?) at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

White-capped sparrowWhite-crowned sparrow at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

SparrowSparrow? at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Common yellow throatCommon yellow throat at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Yellow-rumped warbler (Myrtle)Yellow-rumped warbler (Myrtle) at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Tree swallowsTree swallows at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Wren and white-crowned sparrowWhite-crowned sparrow and a wren at Miller Woods in May.

American goldfinchAmerican goldfinch pair at Miller Woods in May.

Song sparrowAnother sparrow at Miller Woods in May.

Hermit warblerHermit warbler? near Kings Mountain in May.

House finchHouse finch? at Upper Table Rock in May.

Rock wrenRock wren? at Upper Table Rock in May.

Ash-throated flycatcherAsh-throated flycatcher at Denman Wildlife Area in May.

Small bird at Ken Denman Wildlife RefugeUnknown at Denman Wildlife Area in May.

SwallowSwallow at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

WarblerSome sort of warbler? at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

Purple MartinsPurple martins at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

WrenAnother wren at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

SongbirdUnknown at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

SparrowSparrow? at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

WarblerWarbler? at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

Black phoebeBlack phoebe? at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

IMG_1694Mountain bluebird near Union Peak in September.

IMG_1985Red-breasted nuthatch (best I could get) at Crater Lake in September.

IMG_2015Red crossbilss at Crater Lake in September.

IMG_4818Wren on the Eagle Creek Trail in November.

IMG_5040Dark eyed junco at Waverly Lake in December.

Going up a bit in size now (and a little easier to identify).
Grey jayCanada jay (grey jay) along the Crown Zellerbach Trail in March.

Scrub jayCalifornia scrub jay along the Balfour-Klickitat Trail in April.

Stellar's jayStellar’s jay along the Hood River Pipeline Trail in May.

Female red-winged blackbirdFemale red-winged blackbird at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Red-winged blackbirdRed-winged blackbird at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Spotted towheeSpotted towhee at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

StarlingsStarlings along the Hood River Pipeline Trail in May.

Brownheaded cowbirdBrownheaded cowbird at Upper Table Rock in May.

RobinAmerican robin at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Tropical kingbirdTropical kingbird? at Denman Wildlife Area in May.

Black-headed grosbeakBlack-headed grosbeak (also all I could get) at Applegate Lake in May.

Lazuli buntingLazuli bunting at Roxy Ann Peak in May.

Cedar waxwingCedar waxwing at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

IMG_6214Western tanagers, Siskiyou Wilderness in July.

IMG_1094American dipper (Ouzel) near South Umpqua Falls in September.

IMG_2047Townsends solitaire at Crater Lake National Park in September.

IMG_2249Clark’s nutcracker at Crater Lake National Park in September.

IMG_4556Varied thrush along the Eagle Creek Trail in November.

IMG_2981Unknown at Cascade Head in October.

We also struggle with a few of the woodpeckers.
WoodpeckerForest Park in January.

Northern flickerNorthern flicker at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April. We seem to see flickers on nearly every hike, but they don’t often sit still long enough for us to get a decent picture.

Pileated woodpeckerPileated woodpecker at Chehalem Ridge Nature Park in May. We rarely see these but like the flickers, when we do they are very difficult to get a photo of.

Acorn woodpeckerAcorn woodpecker at Denman Wildlife Area in May.

WoodpeckerHairy? woodpecker near Twin Lakes in the Umpqua National Forst in June.

IMG_8655Red breasted sapsucker at E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area in July.

IMG_4737Either a hairy or downy woodpecker along the Eagle Creek Trail in November.

IMG_2764Unknown, Sky Lakes Wilderness in late September.

Next up are scavengers and birds of prey including those pesky hawks.
CrowCrow along the Crown Zellerbach Trail in March.

RavenRaven at Upper Table Rock in May.

Turkey vultureTurkey Vulture at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

American kestralAmerican kestral along the Crown Zellerbach Trail in March.

OspreyOsprey along the Hood River Pipeline Trail in May.

OspreyAnother osprey at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

Bald eagleBald eagle at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

IMG_2517Eagle in the Sky Lakes Wilderness in September. Not sure if it is a bald or golden.

Immature bald eagle and a hawkA bald eagle and hawk at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

HawksPair of hawks at Denman Wildlife Area in May.

Hawk at Ken Denman Wildlife RefugeHawk at Denman Wildlife Area in May.

HawkHawk at Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge in June.

IMG_0907Hawk along the Pacific Crest Trail near Carter Meadows Summit in August.

IMG_2056Hawk at Crater Lake National Park in September.

Barred owlBarred owl at Noble Woods in May.

Great horned owl at Ken Denman Wildlife RefugeGreat horned owl at Denman Wildlife Area in May.

Great horned owlYoung great horned owl at Roxy Ann Peak in May.

Moving on to game birds, a few of the species we saw this year were at the E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area at their breeding facility in June.
IMG_8635

IMG_8640Ring-necked pheasant

IMG_8634Silver pheasant

IMG_8649Near the breeding facility at E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area.

DoveMourning dove at Roxy Ann Peak a in May.

IMG_6290Grouse? in the Siskiyou Wilderness in July.

IMG_9295Grouse in the Mt. Adams Wilderness in August.

IMG_1783Grouse in the Sky Lakes Wilderness in September.

Bodies of water attract a lot of birds and provide us with a less obstructed view vs the forest.
Long billed dowitchers?Long billed dowitchers? at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

KilldeerKilldeer at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

SandpiperSandpiper? at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Great blue heronGreat blue heron at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

KingfisherKingfisher at Julia Butler Hansen Wildlife Refuge in June.

American bitternAmerican bittern at Julia Butler Hansen Wildlife Refuge in June.

White pelicansWhite pelicans at Julia Butler Hansen Wildlife Refuge in June.

Hooded mergansersHooded mergansers at Yakona Nature Preserve in February.

Common mergansersCommon mergansers along the Klickitat Trail in April.

American cootAmerican coot at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Cinnamon tealCinnamon teal at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Ring necked ducks and an American cootRing-necked ducks (and an American coot) at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

Nothern shovelerNorthern shoveler at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

White -fronted geeseWhite-fronted geese at Ankeny Wildlife Refuge in April.

MallardMallard along the Hood River Pipeline Trail in May.

Wood duckWood duck at Denman Wildlife Area in May.

IMG_4906Not sure if this is a ruddy duck at Waverly Lake in December.

IMG_4967Mostly American widgeons with a green winged teal and a female bufflehead or two mixed in at Talking Water Gardens in December.

IMG_5016Bufflehead at Talking Water Gardens in December.

Family of geese on Applegate LakeCanada geese at Applegate Lake in May.

GeeseDomestic geese near the Klickitat Trail in April.

IMG_4914Domestic or hybrid? ducks at Waverly Lake in December.

Categories
Hiking

2022 Flower Gallery

In 2018 we began a tradition of posting a collection of the variety of flowers that we encountered during the years hikes. It’s always a bit shocking to see just how many different varieties we actually saw over the course of the year. It appears that the total in 2022 was right around 400. We are still learning to identify the flowers and are a long way from being able to tell some of the different species apart. For instance, we encounter species in both the genus Castilleja as well as Penstemon regularly but are not typically knowledgeable enough to determine which one we are seeing. That doesn’t take away from our ability to enjoy the flowers though, but the large number of different flowers makes it difficult if not impossible to get them all in one post.

With that in mind here are some (but not all) of the different flowers we saw this past year, in no particular order. (Any IDs provided are best guesses and any corrections or additional IDs are greatly appreciated.)

The first wildflower we spotted was a little violet on February 5th at the Yakona Nature Preserve.
Violet

It was certainly not the last violet we’d encounter as they are one of the more common flowers we see and also one that struggle to identify beyond “violet”.
Pioneer violetsMay 14th – Chehalem Ridge Nature Park

VioletsJune 15th – Donomore Meadows

VioletsJune 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Siskiyou Gap

Marsh violetMarsh violet, June 25th – Goat Marsh Lake

IMG_5305July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5566Wedgeleaf? violet – July 1st – Youngs Valley, Siskiyou Wilderness

Goosefoot violetGoosefoot? violet, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6593July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_9410August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness.

The final flower to be photographed was a bleeding heart enjoying a late season bloom along the Eagle Creek Trail on November 19th.
IMG_4739

Bleeding heartHere is a more photogenic bleeding heart from May 21st on the Kings Mountain Trail.

We were lucky enough to see a handful of bucket list flowers during our trips to Southern Oregon and Northern California.
20220618_084641Snow plant, June 18th – Red Buttes Wilderness

20220702_090623California lady slippers, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_100604(1)Bolander’s lily, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

Scarlet fritillaryScarlet fritillary, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Henderson's fawn lilyHenderson’s fawn lily, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Here are some of the other’s that we encountered over the course of the year.
Pungent desert parsleyPungent desert parsley, April 2nd -Balfour Trail

Columbia desert parsleyColumbia desert parsley, April 2nd – Klickitat Trail

Woodland-starsWoodland stars, April 2nd – Balfour Trail

Pacific hound,s tonguePacific hound’s tongue, April 2nd – Balfour Trail

LupineLupine, April 2nd – Klickitat Trail

Big-leaf mapleBig leaf maple, April 2nd – Klickitat Trail

Slender phloxSlender phlox, April 2nd – Klickitat Trail

FringecupFringecup, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

ButtercupsButtercups, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

CheckermallowCheckermallow, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

CheckermallowAnother checkermallow, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

IrisIris, April 23rd – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

PaintbrushA paintbrush, May 1st – Memaloose Hills

BalsamrootBalsamroot, May 1st – Memaloose Hills

Large-flower triteleiaLarge-flower triteleia, May 1st – Memaloose Hills

Naked broomrape and poison oakNaked broomrape, May 1st – Memaloose Hills

VetchVetch, May 1st – Moiser Plateau

Large-head cloverLarge-head clover, May 1st – Moiser Plateau

FiddleneckFiddleneck, May 1st – Moiser Plateau

Bachelor buttonBachelor button (non-native), May 1st – Moiser Plateau

Service berryService berry, May 7th – Orenco Woods

AvenAven, May 7th – Noble Woods

CamasCamas, May 7th – Miller Woods

GingerWild ginger, May 7th – Miller Woods

Striped coralrootStriped coralroot, May 7th – Miller Woods

Fairy slippersFairy slippers, May 7th – Miller Woods

PlectritisPlectritis, May 14th – Chehalem Ridge Nature Park

Fairy bells and bleeding heartFairy bells, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Snow queenSnow queen, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Red flowering currantRed flowering currant, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

TrilliumTrillium, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

MonkeyflowerA monkeyflower, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Chocolate lilyChocolate lily, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

KittentailsKittentails, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Glacier lilyGlacier lily, May 21st – Elk/Kings Mountain Traverse

Henderson's starsHenderson’s stars, May 25th – Mule Mountain

LarkspurLarkspur, May 25th – Mule Mountain

Possibly a popcorn flower (or a cryptantha)Not sure if this is a cryptantha or a popcorn flower, May 25th – Mule Mountain

Douglas' stitchwortDouglas’ stichwort, May 25th – Mule Mountain

Blue-eyed MaryA blue-eyed Mary, May 25th – Mule Mountain

California poppyCalifornia poppy, May 25th – Mule Mountain

ClarkiaA clarkia, May 25 – Mule Mountain

Hooker's Indian pinkHooker’s Indian pink, May 25th – Mule Mountain

StarflowerStar flower, May 25th – Mule Mountain

California ground coneCalifornia ground cone, May 25th – Mule Mountain

OokowOokow, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Blow wivesBlow wives, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Parry's hawkweed?Best guess is Parry’s hawkweed, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Clustered broomrapeClustered broomrape, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Narrowleaf onionNarrowleaf onion, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

California goldfieldCalifornia goldfield, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Possibly Fitch's tarweedPossibly Fitch’s tarweed, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Marigold pincushionplantMarigold pincushion plant, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

Butterfly and beetles on Arrowleaf buckwheatArrowleaf buckwheat, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

ClarkiaA clarkia, May 26th – Upper Table Rock

IrisIris, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

MIlkvetchMilkvetch, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Wildflowers on Anderson ButteUnknown on Anderson Butte, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Giant white wakerobbinGiant white wakerobbin, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

LarkspurA larkspur, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Rough eyelashweedRough eyelashweed, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

WallflowerWallflower, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

OnionA wild onion, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Jacob's ladderJacob’s ladder, May 27th – Jack-Ash Trail

Death camasDeath camas, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Common madiaCommon madia, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Common ViburnumCommon viburnum, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Hairy Indian paintbrush - Castilleja tenuisHairy Indian paintbrush, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

White campionWhite campion, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Pale flaxPale flax, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Purple oysterPurple oyster (non-native), May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

RoseRose, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

PeaPea, May 28th – Denman Wildlife Area

Kellog's monkeyflowerKellog’s monkeyflower, May 29th – Applegate Lake

Heart-leaf milkweedHeart-leaf milkweed, May 29th – Applegate Lake

Northern phloxNorthern phlox, May 29th – Applegate Lake

LupineWhite lupine, May 29th – Applegate Lake

Carrotleaf horkeliaCarrotleaf horkelia, May 30th – Roxy Ann Peak

Blue-eyed grassBlue-eyed grass, May 30th – Roxy Ann Peak

BaneberryBaneberry, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

Star-flower solomonsealStar-flower solomonseal, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

False lily-of-the valleyFalse lily-of-the valley, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

CandyflowerCandyflower, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

Scouler's corydalisScouler’s corydalis, June 4th – North Siouxon Trail

yellow glandweedYellow glandweed (non-native), June 11th – Julia Butler Hanson Wildlife Refuge

DaisyDaisy (non-native), June 11th – Julia Butler Hanson Wildlife Refuge

Flowering shrub at Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for Columbian White-tailed DeerUnknown shrub (non-native), June 11th – Julia Butler Hanson Wildlife Refuge

VetchA vetch or pea, June 13th – Susan Creek Falls Trail

ColumbineColumbine, June 13th – Susan Creek Falls Trail

SolomonsealSolomonseal, June 13th – North Umpqua Trail

ValerianValerian, June 13th – Lemolo Falls Trail

GooseberryGooseberry, June 14th – Illahee Rock

Blue-eyed MaryBlue-eyed Mary, June 14th – Illahee Rock

Fawn liliesFawn lilies, June 14th – Illahee Rock

PussytoesPussytoes, June 15th – Pacific Crest Trail near the Stateline Trailhead

BistortBistort, June 15th – Donomore Meadows

Cutleaf daisyCutleaf daisy, June 15th – Observation Peak

Lance-leaf Spring Beauty Claytonia lanceolataLance-leaf spring beauty, June 15th – Observation Peak

RockcressA rockcress, June 15th – Observation Peak

Alpine pennycressAlpine pennycress, June 15th – Observation Peak

Quill-leaf Lewisia Lewisia leeanaQuill-leaf lewisia, June 15th – Observation Peak

Marsh marigoldsMarsh marigold, June 15th – Pacific Crest Trail

AnemoneAnemone, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Siskiyou Gap

Jacob's ladderJacob’s ladder, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail

BudsBuds of an unknown flower, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Big Red Mountain

PaintbrushA paintbrush, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Big Red Mountain

Drummond's anemone along the PCTDrummond’s anemone, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Big Red Mountain

Ballhead waterleafBallhead waterleaf, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Big Red Mountain

Mariposa lilyA mariposa lily, June 16th – Pacific Crest Trail near Siskiyou Gap

20220617_072919Diamond? clarkia, June 17th – Bandersnatch Trail

20220617_073325A honeysuckle, June 17th – Bandersnatch Trail

IMG_4315A catchfly, June 17th – Bandersnatch Trail

IMG_4343Blue-head gilia, June 17th – Red Queen Trail

20220617_093917Deerbrush, June 17th – Mike Uthoff Trail

20220617_094806Grand collomia, June 17th – Mike Uthoff Trail

IMG_4460A phaceli, June 17th – Mike Uthoff Trail

IMG_4589Rhododendron, June 18th – Frog Pond Trail

20220618_073810Pretty Face, June 18th – Frog Pond Trail

20220625_115233Believe this is some sort of saxifrage, June 25th – Toutle Trail

20220625_112218Avalanche lily, June 25th – Toutle Trail

IMG_5079A penstemon, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5080A phlox, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5163Lewis flax, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5173A paintbrush, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5203Nuttall’s sandwort?, July 1st -Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5220Queen’s cup, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5265Beargrass, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5277Shooting star, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

Wolley-head cloverWolley-head clover, July 1st – Siskiyou ikyWilderness

IMG_5354A nightshade, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220701_151859Siskiyou lewisia, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5562Spotted coralroot, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5565This tiny flower was at the edge of the meadow in Young’s Valley, July 1st – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_065556Azalea, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5627Honeysuckle, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

Pacific ninebarkPacific ninebark, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

streambank bird's-foot trefoilStreambank bird’s-foot trefoil, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

White-vien wintergreenWhite-vein wintergreen, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_091852California pitcher-plant, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_094208Also California pitcher-plant, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

20220702_100311White-stemmed frasera, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5776Washington lily, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5809Phantom orchid, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5830Oregon sunshine, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_5905Pussypaws, July 2nd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6142Musk monkeyflower, July 3rd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6227Klamath arnica, July 3rd – Siskiyou Wilderness

White rushlilyWhite rushlily, July 3rd – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6418Spirea, July 4th – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6423Wild onion, July 4th – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6434A penstemon, July 4th – Siskiyou Wilderness

IMG_6483Phlox, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6490Brown’s peony, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6505Yet another paintbrush, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

IMG_6583Silverleaf phacelia with visitor, July 9th – Mt. Ireland

Venus penstemonVenus penstemon, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_062027Douglas dustymaidens, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

IMG_6640Bog orchid, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_064506Mountain lady slippers, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_073039Rosy pussytoes, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_073735Yellow columbine, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

heart-leaved bittercressHeart-leaved bittercress?, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_092803Elephants head, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220710_112424Cone flower, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

IMG_6858Tall mountain bluebells, July 10th – Catherine Creek Trail

20220711_062416Another wild onion, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_062408Scarlet gilia, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_062801Arrowleaf groundsel, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_064029Purple sticky geranium, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_093724Ragged robin, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_063742False? sunflower, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220711_144805White mariposa lily, July 11th – Horse Ranch Trail

20220712_075029Rosy paintbrush, July 12th – Buck Creek Trail

Lyall's RockcressLyall’s rockcress, July 12th – Buck Creek Trail

20220713_063711Pacific coralroot, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

20220713_065301Hyssop, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

IMG_7753Another penstemon, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

IMG_7689Thistle, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

IMG_7723Oregon checker-mallow, July 13th – Rock Springs
Trail

Moneses uniflora - one-flowered monesesThis was a new one for us one-flowered moneses, July 14th – Bear Creek Trail

20220714_101502Pinedrop, July 14th – Bear Creek Trail

IMG_7988Sagebrush mariposa lily, July 14th – Wallowa Homeland

20220714_130643Blanket flower, July 14th – Wallowa Homeland

20220714_131056Yarrow, July 14th – Wallowa Homeland

IMG_8524Scouler’s bluebells, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8192Inside-out flower, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

Tiger lilyTiger lily, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8497Bluebells of Scotland, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8252Subalpine mariposa lily, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8303Western sweetvetch, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8335Coiled lousewort, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8353Best guess is subapline fleabane, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

20220723_120051Orange agoseris, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

20220723_130806A larkspur, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8526Mock orange, July 23rd – Silverstar Mountain

IMG_8670Chicory (non-native), July 30th – E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area

IMG_8735Indian pipe, August 6th – Yasko Falls Trail

20220806_104434Leopard lily, August 6th – Hemlock Creek Trail

IMG_8874Mountain owl’s clover, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8879Rainiera, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8899Hedgenettle, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8905Large boykina, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8991Candy sticks, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_8987Monkshood, August 6th – Yellowjacket Loop Trail

IMG_9053Scarlet monkeyflower, August 7th – Fall Creek Falls Trail

IMG_9269White mountain heather, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9307Mountain heather, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9469Gentian, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9504False hellebore, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9409A saxifrage, August 13th – Mt. Adams Wilderness

IMG_9622Beardstongue, August 20th – Grizzley Peak

Shasta knotweedShasta knotweed, August 22nd – Mt. Shasta Wilderness

marsh grass-of-ParnassusMarsh grass-of-Parnassus, August 22nd – Mt. Shasta Wilderness

IMG_9731Western pasque flower, August 22nd – Mt. Shasta Wilderness

20220823_074107Bigelow’s sneezeweed, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_9972Western snakeroot, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0020A buckwheat, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

Autumn dwarf gentian - Gentianella amarellaAutumn dwarf gentian, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0216Saffron-flowered lupine, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

20220823_121615An aster or fleabane, August 23rd – Trinity Alps Wilderness

Hooded ladies tressesHooded ladies tresses, August 24th – Russian Wilderness

20220824_111610Can’t seem to identify this flower on the shore of Russian Lake, August 24th – Russian Wilderness

IMG_0528This one has me a bit stumped too, it looks like a wirelettuce or some sort of lewisa, August 24th – Russian Wilderness

IMG_0596Buckwheat, August 24th – Russian Wilderness

20220826_064654A monkeyflower (dwarf purple?), August 26th -Pacific Crest Trail near Carter Meadows Summit

20220826_080306Mountain coyote mint, August 26th – Pacific Crest Trail near Carter Meadows Summit

20220826_080417Sierra larkspur, August 26th – Pacific Crest Trail

IMG_0964Tasselflower brickellbush, August 26th – South Fork Lakes Trail

20220826_100503Monkeyflower, August 26th – South Fork Lakes Trail

IMG_1050Thistle, August 26th – South Fork Lakes Trail

20220826_103807California hairbells, August 26th – South Fork Lakes Trail

Common toadflaxCommon toadflax (non-native), September 10th – Spring Valley Greenway

IMG_1563Fireweed, September 17th – Union Peak Trail

IMG_1757Douglas spirea, September 18th – Sky Lakes Wilderness

Crater Lake Collomia?Best guess is Crater Lake collomia, September 19th – Dutton Creek Trail

20220925_092616Another mystery seen near the Cold Springs Trailhead, September 25th – Sky Lakes Wilderness

We have a few wildflower hikes planned in 2023. We are hoping to see at least one or two more that we haven’t before along with plenty of familiar faces. Happy Trails!

Categories
Hiking Year-end wrap up

The Hikes of 2022 – A Look Back

What a strange year 2022 was for us from a hiking standpoint. We have come to the conclusion that there is no such thing as a “normal” year knowing that there will always be surprises and things that we haven’t experienced yet. This year was full of ups and downs, sometimes on the same day. We go into every year with an initial set of hikes planned out for the year knowing that by the end of the year changes will have been made, but this year may have seen the most changes to the initial plan in the 10 years we’ve been doing this. As is the case most years weather and wildfires caused the majority of the changes but in 2022 we were the cause several as well.

Our goal is to get out once a month from Jan through April and in both November and December while taking at least one hike a week from May through October. We had managed to hike a least once a month since February 2013 but the injury bug finally got one of us this year. Heather had to shut her hiking down at the end of September but did manage to get back out for the December hike. I kept to the schedule but instead of the planned hikes which would have been new to both of us I put some new twists on some old favorites. My end of the year numbers were 61 days hiking totaling just over 660 miles with a little more than 115,200′ of elevation gain. Heather’s numbers were 55 hikes, approximately 557 miles, and 97,450′ of elevation gain.

Once again we focused on hikes that were new to us (at least in part) so no day was an exact duplicate of one we’d done before. Union Creek Falls (post) was very close for me but I did manage to see one section of Union Creek that I hadn’t bushwhacked to on my first visit (post). Heather had not been with me that day due to an injury she’d sustained earlier in the day at Abbott Butte. While our Elk and Kings Mountain Loop (post) in May was a repeated hike we added a stop at Killin Wetlands to keep the day from being a repeat. Forty-four days were completely new trail for me while forty-five of Heather’s were new.

Another focus was our continuing quest to complete 100 featured hikes from each of the five William L. Sullivan’s “100 Hikes…” books (Feb 2022 Progress Report). We’ll go into more detail on that quest in our annual progress report next month, but we managed to make significant progress in the Southern Oregon/Northern California area and inched a little closer to our goal in Eastern Oregon. We now have an outside shot of finishing all 500 by the end of 2024.

Five days were spent hiking in Washington while twelve days were, at least in part, spent in California, our first visits since 2018. We visited four designated wilderness areas in California including our first ever visit to the Siskiyou Wilderness (post).

It’s interesting to me each year to see what hikes were the furtherst in each direction on the map. This year our most southern hike was our visit to Trail and Long Gulch Lakes (post).
IMG_0752Long Gulch Lake. The furthest south we hiked was on the trail a short distance after leaving this lake.

To the west one of the beaches along the Pacific Ocean is typically our most western hike but this year it was just inland from the ocean at Yakona Nature Preserve (post).
Yakona Nature PreserveTechnically the western most spot we hiked at was the trailhead for this hike, but the Yaquina River was a nicer picture.

Surprisingly our northernmost hike was neither our visit to Goat Marsh Lake at Mt. St. Helens (post) or Crystal Lake in the Mt. Adams Wilderness (post) but rather a hike we did just across the Columbia River from Oregon at the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White-Tailed Deer (post).
Brooks SloughWe hit our northernmost point during the stretch of our hike that followed Brooks Slough.

Our one trip to Eastern Oregon produced our easternmost hike which was a visit to the Wallowa Homeland (post) in Wallowa, Oregon.
IMG_8011View of the Wallowa Mountains from our easternmost point.

While weather considerations prompted us to make a number of changes to the timing of, and sometimes destinations for, our hikes 2022 may well have been the best all-around weather conditions we’ve experienced in a year. Several hikes throughout the year had forecasts for possible rain showers yet we only experience a couple of very brief periods of precipitation. Clouds also seemed to be less of an issue this year than in years past. It seems that almost every year we have at least one “viewpoint” hike where we arrive to find ourselves in a sea of grey. This year that really didn’t happen. We did arrive at the lookouts atop Illahee Rock (post) in the clouds, but the lookouts were the goal not necessarily the view.
Cupola lookout on Illahee Rock

Furthermore, it was just the first of two stops that day and by the time we arrived at our second viewpoint of the day above Twin Lakes the views had drastically improved.
Big Twin Lake from the viewpoint above Twin Lakes

Wildfires, which there were still far too many of, also had much less of an impact on our plans than they’ve had the last couple of years. The second week of September was the only time fires forced us to get creative. Heavy smoke saw us stick close to home for a short hike at the Spring Valley Greenway (post).
IMG_1506That’s the Sun above the trees.

I believe the destinations for our 2022 hikes were the most diverse in terms of the type of managing agency/entity. We visited trails located on private timberland (obtaining permits ahead of time when required), in city, county, state and national parks, and privately owned nature preserves (again with permits where required). We took hikes on BLM managed lands, state and federal wildlife refuges, state and national forests, wilderness areas, and a National Volcanic Monument. Our hikes also took place on a variety of trail types and surfaces.
Wildwood TrailIced over snow in Portland’s Forest Park.

CZ TrailThe Crown-Zellerbach Trail, a converted logging road.

Klickitat TrailThe Klickitat Trail, a converted railroad.

Hood RIver from the end of the Hood River Pipeline TrailThe Hood River Pipeline Trail.

Rock Creek Trail along NE WilkinsSidewalk, Rock Creek Trail.

Kings Mountain TrailRope section of the Kings Mountain Trail.

Mt. McLoughlin from Touville RoadGravel Road at Denman Wildlife Area.

Brooks Slough RoadPaved Brooks Slough Road, Julia Hansen Butler Wildlife Refuge (it is open to cars).

FR 20Dirt road at Siskiyou Gap.

Ridge to Observation PeakCross-country to Observation Peak.

IMG_5881Crossing over granite to reach the Devil’s Punchbowl in the Siskiyou Wilderness.

IMG_6794Water covered trail at Catherine Creek Meadows.

IMG_9702Sandy dirt Mt. Shasta.

IMG_1610Rock field, Union Peak.

IMG_2350The remains of the Union Creek Trail.

IMG_4667Frozen tunnel on the Eagle Creek Trail.

As far as our destinations go waterfalls and lakes were the top two goals for the hikes this past year, and we are always on the lookout for wildlife and flowers. There were also a few unique features, both natural and man-made, that we visited.
Witch's CastleWitch’s Castle – Forest Park, Portland, OR

Maryann's Wind Telephone at Yakona Nature PreserveWind Telephone, Yakona Nature Preserve – Newport, OR

Erratic RockErratic Rock (post)

Bunker 3 at Ken Denman Wildlife RefugeOne of several military bunkers at Ken Denman Wildlife Area – Medford, OR

Umpqua Hot SpringsUmpqua Hot Springs – Umpqua National Forest, OR

Illahee Rock LookoutIllahee Rock Lookout – Umpqua National Forest, OR

Twin Lakes ShelterTwin Lakes Shelter – Umpqua National Forest, OR

Donomore CabinDonomore Cabin – Donomore Meadows, CA

IMG_6551Mt. Ireland Lookout – Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, OR

IMG_6819Cabin at Catherine Creek Meadows – Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, OR

IMG_7029Reds Horse Ranch – Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, OR

IMG_7609Lodge ruins – Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, OR

IMG_7869Bear Creek Guard Station – Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, OR

IMG_8007Gazebo on Tick Hill – Wallowa, OR

IMG_9834Spring above Southgate Meadows – Mount Shasta Wilderness, CA

IMG_9915Panther Spring – Mount Shasta Wilderness, CA

IMG_3722Remnants of the OSU Dean’s house – McDonald Forest, Corvallis, OR

IMG_4991Talking Water Gardens – Water treatment wetlands, Albany, OR

I will save the flowers, wildlife, waterfalls, and lakes for their own 2022 galleries. We’re looking forward to 2023 and hoping that Heather makes a full recovery. We’ve done a bit of shuffling for the first part of 2023 to help ease her back into things. While 2022 was a good year we hope 2023 has a few less bumps along the way. Happy Trails!

Categories
California Hiking Klamath Mountains Trinity Alps Trip report

Hidden and South Fork Lakes – 08/26/2022

For the last hike of our week in Etna, CA we had chosen Hidden and South Fork Lakes in the Trinity Alps Wilderness. (Featured hike #91 in Sullivan’s “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Southern Oregon & Northern California” 4th edition.) This was both the shortest hike and drive of the week which would allow us to get home as early as possible. We began the hike at the Carter Meadows Summit Trailhead which is right next to a helipad. This area was hit pretty hard by the 2021 Haypress Fire.
IMG_0830

From the small parking area a trail descends 50′ to a junction which was left unsigned by the fire. Here the to the left was the Pacific Crest Trail coming up from the south and heading uphill to the north on the far right. A second trail to the right led downhill to the Carter Meadows Campground and finally the Hidden Lake Trail went straight ahead on along a ridge.
IMG_0831The PCT running left to right with the Hidden Lake Trail extending straight ahead.

IMG_0832Remnants of a trail sign. The sticks across the Hidden Lake Trail are to let PCT hikers know that is not their trail.

We followed the Hidden Lake Trail just under a mile to Hidden Lake. (Sullivan showed a distance of 1.2 miles but our GPS put it at 0.9 each way.) The trail followed a ridge and gained a little over 500′ of elevation which doesn’t sound like a lot but it felt quite a bit harder than we’d expected. Perhaps it was the fact that it was the final day of our trip and we were just worn out, but we were glad that we hadn’t tried to do this portion of the hike the day before after our Gulch Lake Loop (post).
IMG_0833

IMG_0835A layer of smoke over the valley on the horizon.

IMG_0836A fleabane, possibly California rayless fleabane.

IMG_0856Hidden Lake Trail following the ridge.

IMG_0853Dwarf purple monkeyflower

IMG_0868Blue-eyed Mary

IMG_0871Approaching Hidden Lake.

We arrived at Hidden Lake right around 7am, early enough that the Sun hadn’t had time to rise high enough to hit the lake.
IMG_0872

The lighting conditions were not ideal for photos but it was nice to sit in the shade by the lake after the climb up.
IMG_0878

After a short break we headed back along the ridge to the PCT.
IMG_0893

IMG_0895Golden-mantle watching us from atop the ridge.

IMG_0900Looking back now that there was a little more sunlight.

We turned right onto the PCT and began a 0.9 mile descent to a crossing of the South Fork Scott River.
IMG_0901

IMG_0903Diamond clarkia

IMG_0905A small raptor watching from a snag.

IMG_0908

IMG_0910Wildflowers in the burn scar.

IMG_0912Spreading dogbane

IMG_0913A small stream/spring providing some green.

IMG_0916Bleeding heart, fireweed, monkeyflower, and hedge nettle along the stream.

IMG_0923Yarrow and Oregon sunshine.

IMG_0925

IMG_0926

IMG_0931California harebells

IMG_0935

IMG_0936A lot more green vegetation near the river crossing.

IMG_0941

IMG_0948South Fork Scott River

20220826_080306Mountain coyote mint

20220826_080407Mountain larkspur

20220826_080417Mountain larkspur

IMG_0953Snacks

IMG_0952Campsites along the PCT near the river crossing.

Two tenths of a mile beyond the river crossing we came to an unsigned junction with the South Fork Lakes Trail.
IMG_0954You can just make out the trail ahead heading uphill to the right.

We turned onto this trail and climbed a quarter of a mile to a meadow where the tread became faint.
IMG_0959This trail was the most overgrown/least maintained of all the trails we’d been on this trip.

IMG_0960Nearing the meadow.

IMG_0961Entering the meadow and losing the trail.

IMG_0964As of yet unidentified flower in the meadow.

We were behind a pair of bow hunters who were just exiting the meadow at the other end so we were able to follow their path through the tall grass. Beyond the meadow the trail began a steep rocky half mile climb before leveling out in a basin near Lower South Fork Lake.
IMG_0966There was a brief pause in the climb while the trail passed a series of springs.

IMG_0968Vegetation along the trail at the springs.

IMG_0972

IMG_0974Back to climbing.

IMG_0975The final spring that we passed was coming out of this hollowed trunk.

IMG_0976

IMG_0978

IMG_0980

IMG_0982There were several places where it looked like the trail was going to finally crest but when you got there you just found more uphill.

IMG_0985Finally the trail is leveling out.

It had just been a mile between the PCT junction and the lower lake but it had been the hardest mile of our trip. A well deserved break was taken at the lake.
IMG_0994

After the break we followed the trail around the west side of the lake and then bushwhacked two tenths of a mile to Upper South Fork Lake.
IMG_1000

IMG_1002Looking back over the lower lake.

IMG_1003Heading off-trail for the upper lake.

We took another break at the upper lake watching dragon flies zoom up and down the shore.
IMG_1006_stitch

IMG_1027

The bow hunters arrived as we were starting to head back. It had been years since they’d visited the lake and were glad to see that at least most of the trees, including those around the campsite had survived the fire. We headed back down to the PCT and then hiked back up to the trailhead passing another group of backpackers heading for the lakes along the way.
IMG_1028Back to the lower lake.

IMG_1030A penstemon

IMG_1035Another look at the cool spring.

20220826_100459Monkeyflowers along the springs.

IMG_1043Butterfly on western snakeroot

IMG_1045Back through the meadow.

IMG_1050Thistle

20220826_103807Close up of a California harebell.

IMG_1063I can see a car at the trailhead.

IMG_1064The helipad at the trailhead.

IMG_1065The helipad at the trailhead.

Sullivan has these hikes listed as 2.4 miles out-and-back to Hidden Lake and 6 miles out-and-back to Upper South Fork Lake. Our GPS put the distances as 1.8 and 5 respectively giving us a 6.8 mile total for the day. The cumulative elevation gain was 1770′.

The lower mileage allowed us to get an earlier start on our drive home than expected which was nice. We were back home in Salem a little after 4:30pm giving us plenty of time to unpack and relax for a bit. Despite the flat tire on Wednesday it had been both a successful and enjoyable trip. It also marked our completion of all of Sullivan’s featured hikes in California. That doesn’t mean we are done hiking in that State but it does mean we are that much closer to completing our goal of hiking all the featured hikes in Sullivan’s Southern Oregon & Northern California guidebook (post). Happy Trails!

Flickr: Hidden and South Fork Lakes

Categories
California Hiking Klamath Mountains Trinity Alps Trip report

Trail Gulch and Long Gulch Lakes Loop – 08/25/2022

After our adventure with the flat tire Wednesday (post) we slept in a little since Valley Tire didn’t open until 8am. Not heading out first thing for a hike did give us a chance to walk from the motel to Grain Street Bakery where we had some delicious scones and half a breakfast sandwich (the other half wound up being Friday’s breakfast). After breakfast we drove into Fort Jones where Valley Tire got us in right away and pulled a small rock out of the tire which had blistered in several places meaning it needed to be replaced. They had a set on hand so we had them replace all four tires and were on our way by 8:45am. It was plenty early for us to still get our planned hike in so we stopped by our room, changed, and grabbed our packs before heading back up to Carter Meadows Summit. From the summit we continued driving downhill another 0.7 miles and turned left onto Carter Meadows Road (FR 39N08) at a sign for Carter Meadows Trailheads. We followed Carter Meadows Road for 1.8 miles to the Trail Gulch Trailhead.
IMG_0604

Before getting into the hike please note that many maps have Trail Gulch Lake and Long Gulch Lake reversed including the map embedded on the Forest Service page linked above. Our GPS as well as the PCT paper map that we were carrying also showed the lakes reversed but the signage along the trails here are correct. This loop is also almost entirely within the fire scar of the 2021 Haypress Fire although portions of the forest did not burn too intensely.

From the trailhead the trail climbs steadily but not too steeply along a creek. It soon enters the Trinity Alps Wilderness and at the 0.9 mile mark crosses the creek.
IMG_0611

IMG_0612An aster (or a fleabane, it’s so hard to tell).

IMG_0613Musk monkeyflower

IMG_0618Tiny green frog.

IMG_0619It was easy to spot where the creek was based on the green.

IMG_0621The wilderness boundary.

IMG_0625

IMG_0628The creek crossing.

IMG_0629Paintbrush

IMG_0631A checker-mallow near the creek.

Shortly after crossing the creek the trail veered away from it and began a steeper climb to a junction with a 0.3 mile trail to Trail Gulch Lake.
IMG_0635

IMG_0641A junco. We saw a large number of small birds flying around during our trip, mostly junco’s and chickadees but they rarely ever sat still where we could see them.

IMG_0649Pointer for Trail Gulch Lake 0.8 miles from the Creek Crossing.

We turned right on the 0.3 mile trail which climbed to Trail Gulch Lake.
IMG_0651

IMG_0653

IMG_0656

The lake was very scenic but the combination of the position of the Sun and a hint of smoke in the sky made capturing it with the cameras difficult.
IMG_0660

After a short break we returned to the Trail Gulch Trail and continued further up the gulch. The trail gained 700′ over the next mile to reach a pass above Trail Gulch Lake.
IMG_0670

IMG_0672One of several deer seen running uphill as we made our way up the trail.

IMG_0675View back down Trail Gulch.

IMG_0676

IMG_0684Paintbrush

IMG_0685

IMG_0689Peaks in the Russian Wilderness.

IMG_0691Arriving at the pass.

IMG_0693Trail Gulch Lake from the pass.

IMG_0694Clark’s nutcracker

Just over the pass was a trail junction with a mix of signed and unsigned trails. We took a hard right on the unsigned Trail Gulch Tie Trail which was just slightly above a trail with sign pointing to Steveale Meadows.
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IMG_0700The sign for Steveale Meadows where we went uphill on the trail to the right.

The tie trail gained 400′ as it traversed a severely burnt hillside before arriving at a pass above Long Gulch Lake 1.1 miles from the junction.
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IMG_0709View south from the tie trail.

IMG_0711Approaching the pass.

IMG_0712Sullivan mentions that it is possible to scramble 0.2 miles to the right along this ridge to get a view of Mt. Shasta and the heart of the Trinity Alps but with the smoke on the horizon we didn’t feel it was worth the effort and skipped that option.

IMG_0713Looking down into Long Gulch from the pass.

After pausing at the pass we started downhill and began getting occasional views of Long Gulch Lake.
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IMG_0724To the north we could see much of the route we’d taken the day before on the way to Siphon and Russian Lakes.

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IMG_0726Chipmunk with a snack.

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A slightly frustrating feature of the trail down was a long switchback along a ridge which led past and away from the lake before turning back toward it. That big swing made the 1.4 miles down to the lake seem to take forever.
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IMG_0738The outlet creek.

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IMG_0750Long Gulch Trail passed to the north of Long Gulch Lake for a quarter mile.

IMG_0752The pass that the trail came down is along the ridge to the left here.

The trail continued west beyond the lake another third of a mile before arriving at a junction.
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IMG_0759Parnassian on mountain coyote mint.

IMG_0760Skipper on mountain coyote mint.

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At the junction we turned right beginning a 2.7 mile gradual descent to the Long Gulch Trailhead.

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IMG_0772Meadow with a number of big trees that survived the fire.

IMG_0778Common buckeye

IMG_0779A copper or blue

IMG_0790Lorquin’s admiral

IMG_0798Leaving the Trinity Alps Wilderness.

IMG_0803The trail briefly followed the Long Gulch Creek.

IMG_0808Checker-mallow

IMG_0809The trail crossed the creek just under 2 miles from the junction.

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IMG_0818Arriving at the Long Gulch Trailhead.

The only other person we saw all day was a backpacker who had just hiked out of Long Gulch Lake and was packing up his truck at the trailhead. He offered us a lift to our car but we wanted to finish hiking Sullivan’s loop so we declined. Sullivan described following horse trails for 0.9 miles back to the Trail Gulch Trailhead rather than following the road for 0.8 miles.

We crossed the road at a post and began to follow the horse trail.
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Sullivan showed a junction after 0.3 miles just before arriving at a creek. As we neared the creek our GPS showed us having gone the 0.3 miles so we were looking for a trail to our right. We spotted what looked like it might be a trail complete with some flagging so we turned up hill following it.
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Long story short we’d turned too early and wound up just below the road at a horseshoe turn. At that point it was easier to bushwack up to the road and follow it back to the trailhead instead of searching for the horse trail so we finished the loop on the road.
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IMG_0827We did pass a sign for the horse trail along the road.

As I neared the trailhead a large bird flew into a nearby tree. I took a couple of pictures and it appears that it may have been an owl.
IMG_0829To the far right of the photo in between the green and orange branches is where it landed.

This was a 10.2 mile loop with 2280′ of elevation gain.

Our drive back to Etna was delightfully uneventful and after cleaning up we headed to Etna Brewing for a great meal and some beer. Despite the tire fiasco we were still on track to finish all five featured hikes before heading back to Salem. Happy Trails!

Flickr: Gulch Lakes Loop

Categories
California Hiking Klamath Mountains Trip report

Russian Lake – 08/24/2022

Our third day in Northern California was set to be our longest. Our goal was Russian Lake which is Sullivan’s featured hike #90 in his “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Southern Oregon & Northern California” (edition 4.2) guidebook. Sullivan’s described hike is only 8.6 miles with 1300′ of elevation gain starting from the Deacon Lee Trailhead. Normally that is where we would have started our hike but his description of the drive to that trailhead is less than encouraging. He says “This narrow road is no place for drivers with a fear of heights. And because of sharp rocks, you must drive slowly to avoid blowouts.” Given our trouble earlier this year with low tire pressure (post) we were reluctant to attempt the drive. Another option was provided by Boots on the Trail using the PCT (post).

This approach only required 0.6 miles of driving on gravel roads as we parked at the second switchback of Forest Road 39N48 within sight of the Pacific Crest Trail.
IMG_0249PCT below FR 39N48.

We walked downhill to the PCT and turned right following it along the hillside.
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IMG_0257Tail and Long Gulches in the Trinity Alps Wilderness (our next hike).

IMG_0266Lots of buckwheat along the ridge.

At the 0.7 mile mark we crossed an old roadbed.
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For the next 3.8 miles the PCT alternated between forest and open hillside in a series of ups and downs before arriving at a junction with the Deacon Lee Trail.
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IMG_0269Buckwheat

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IMG_0289Trinity Alps Wilderness

IMG_0290Caesar and Thompson Peak

IMG_0291We would be passing below the peak in the distance later.

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IMG_0300Small buck on the hillside above the PCT.

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IMG_0296The Deacon Lee Trail was visible crossing the opening on the far hillside.

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IMG_0308Checker-mallow

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IMG_0311Crescent butterfly

IMG_0318Small spring along the PCT.

IMG_0321The junction with the Deacon Lee Trail.

We turned onto the Deacon Lee Trail following pointers for Syphon (Siphon on maps) and Waterdog Lakes.
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The Deacon Lee Trail follows an old roadbed through a forest and across an open hillside that was full of buckwheats.
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IMG_0334Dwarf lupine

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IMG_0341Fritillary butterfly on spreading dogbane.

IMG_0343Nearing Siphon Lake.

20220824_093949Siphon Lake was just under a mile from the PCT.

We took a break at Siphon Lake to enjoy the scenery before continuing along the old roadbed.
IMG_0356Old pipe that used to bring water down to mines lower on the hillside.

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A third of a mile from Siphon Lake the trail veered right leaving the old roadbed and becoming single track.
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We were now heading NW and descending slightly.
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We spotted a doe in the trail ahead stopped in its tracks staring at us.
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She had a pair of fawns with her which we didn’t spot until they headed back down the trail. She stayed put though and as we slowly made our way downhill we were wondering if whether or not she was going to follow them. Soon one of the fawns reappeared and we all stood staring at one another for a few minutes before they finally retreated.
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IMG_0384Zoomed in on the pair.

IMG_0383The curious fawn.

After the deer had moved on we continued downhill to a point where the ridge on our right came down near the trail. Here we spotted a cairn and what appeared to be a use trail that we hoped would lead down to Russian Lake.
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We could have continued downhill on the Deacon Lee Trail another 0.3 miles to a junction where a right turn would have led us past Waterdog Lake to Russian Lake in half a mile but cutting over the ridge would save us around three quarters of a mile. We pretty easily found the use trail leading steeply downhill.
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When we neared Russian Lake we went to the right to visit a small pond in the rocks above the lake.
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IMG_0394The pond was full of tadpoles.

After taking a break overlooking the lake we made our way around its NW side and crossed the dry outlet creek.
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Hooded ladies tressesHooded ladies tresses

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IMG_0462View from the outlet creek.

We explored the rocks on the NE side of the lake with views of Russian Peak and some other interesting rock formations.
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IMG_0454Russian Peak

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We both fell in love with this lake and wished we were staying there for a couple of days just to explore the area more but alas we weren’t so after a nice break we recrossed the outlet creek and picked up a trail heading toward Waterdog Lake.
IMG_0458Fireweed near the outlet.

20220824_111610Large boykinia

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20220824_112125Saxifrage seed head

IMG_0469It was a pretty good drop down to Waterdog Lake.

IMG_0473Waterdog Lake.

Waterdog Lake was a nice lake but not nearly as dramatic as Russian Lake had been. As we made our way around the lake we spotted a large frog and several deer, one of which couldn’t stop sneezing.
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IMG_0488The deer were across the lake in those trees.

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IMG_0504Looking back along the lake.

The trail climbed away from the lake offering a brief glimpse of Lower Russian Lake.
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After cresting a saddle the trail dropped to a junction with the Deacon Lee Trail near the boundary of the Russian Wilderness.
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We turned left following pointers for the PCT and Siphon Lake.
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It was a pretty steady 0.3 mile climb back to where we had left the trail earlier and then another good climb back up to the old roadbed.
IMG_0519Paintbrush

IMG_0526There were dozens of lizards scurrying across the trails all day but not many stopped long enough for photos.

IMG_0528Haven’t been able to identify this one yet.

We paused again briefly at Siphon Lake before continuing on and then retraced our steps to the car. The only other person we saw all day was a lone bow hunter.
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IMG_0538Butterfly on mountain coyote mint

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20220824_134541Another butterfly on mountain coyote mint.

IMG_0569Grasshopper that became obsessed with Heather’s glove.

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20220824_144345Cricket

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Our hike came in at 14.8 miles with approximately 2900′ cumulative elevation gain.

Our adventure for the day was only beginning though. Ironically shortly after passing Carter Meadows Summit our “low tire pressure” light once again came on. We made it back down to Callahan but less than a mile later I could feel the car begin to pull right so we pulled off Highway 3 into some gravel. The front passenger side tire was flat. I got the jack and spare tire out but was struggling to get the tire off due to the lug nuts being quite tight. Heather was on the phone trying to secure roadside service but the call center on the other end couldn’t even figure out where we were. (Seriously it was a State Highway a mile outside of a town shown on every map but I digress.) I finally managed to get the flat off but hadn’t raised the car quite far enough to get the spare on and of course as I tried to lift the car a bit more it rolled forward off the jack. I managed to get the jack back under and the car up a bit when a pair of ladies in a Forest Service Truck turned around to check on us. We cannot thank Megan and Malia enough, they were able to get their jack under the car to shore it up and used a shovel to create a little more room under the car in order for us to get it high enough to get the spare on. It was over 90 degrees and nearing 5pm and who knows how long we’d have been out there because Heather was still trying to get the road side assistance to understand where we were (she even gave GPS coordinates).

By the time we got back to Etna it was too late to find a tire place so we returned to our motel and put a plan together for the following day. We would get up and drive to Valley Tire & Tackle in Fort Jones when they opened at 8am in hopes that they could either repair the tire or had a set of replacements (we’d already had both driver side tires patched up this year) and then depending on how long that took we would either hike later in the day or extend our stay in order to get all our planned hikes in. After all we didn’t want to leave one featured hike undone that far from home. Happy Trails!

Flickr: Russian Lake

Categories
California Hiking Klamath Mountains Trinity Alps

Boulder Lakes Loop (Trinity Alps) – 08/23/2022

By spending the night in Etna, CA we were only 30 to 45 minutes from the trailheads for the four remaining hikes we had planned for the week. As mentioned in the previous post we chose to do East Boulder Lake first due to it being the closest to the recently started Callahan Fire and thus the most likely to be affected if that fire were to escape containment. From Etna we drove south on Highway 3 to Callahan then made our way to the East Boulder Trailhead.
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The road to the trailhead passes through forest burned in the 2021 Haypress Fire but the trailhead and trails for our hike escaped damage.

Sullivan describes three options for his featured hike; a 4 mile out-and-back to East Boulder Lake, a 6.4 mile out-and-back to a pass beyond the lake, and a 9.8 mile lollipop loop past Middle Boulder Lake at the edge of the fire scar which was the option we were planning on. The East Boulder Trail climbed gradually at first through the forest and a couple of small meadows before steepening and climbing past a small waterfall on East Boulder Creek.
IMG_9938Entering the Trinity Alps Wilderness.

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IMG_9957First view of the small waterfall.

IMG_9961Bigelow’s sneezeweed

IMG_9963Marsh grass-of-Parnassus

20220823_074146Not sure what these little guys are.

20220823_074341Checker-mallow

IMG_9972Western snakeroot

IMG_9973Passing the waterfall.

Above the falls the trail leveled out some and made a final short climb to East Boulder Lake, just over 1.8 miles from the trailhead.
IMG_9974Peaks in the Russian Wilderness to the NE.

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IMG_9984Dam near East Boulder Lake.

The trail crosses the dam here but there were better views this time of the morning in the other direction so we detoured to the left admiring the reflections in the lake.

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We took a nice break along the lake shore listening to cow bells coming from the trees on the far shore.
IMG_0007There were cows out there somewhere but we couldn’t see them.

After the break we crossed the dam and continued around the lake.
IMG_0008View from the dam. We had to watch out for frogs here.

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We lost the trail briefly in a meadow on the southern end of the lake but picked it up again after crossing the inlet creek.
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IMG_0019We should have stuck closer to the lake.

IMG_0020Buckwheat

IMG_0021Back on the trail where the cows were just leaving.

The trail then passed two smaller unnamed lakes and Upper Boulder Lake where there were several cows and some ducks.
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We detoured to the right to get a view of Upper Boulder Lake then returned to the trail and began to climb out of the basin to the pass.
IMG_0029Upper Boulder Lake

IMG_0031_stitchUpper Boulder Lake in the background.

IMG_0045One of the cows on the far side of the lake to the left.

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IMG_0048Toothed owl’s clover

IMG_0053Ducks on Upper Boulder Lake.

IMG_0059The climb was fairly steep at times.

IMG_0060_stitchAll four lakes in view.

IMG_0069Almost to the pass.

IMG_0071At the pass.

IMG_0074Looking south further into the Trinity Alps Wilderness.

Beyond the pass the trail descended 150 yards to the Pacific Crest Trail where we turned right.
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We turned right onto that trail following it for 2 miles to another pass. The scenery along this section was great, particularly the colorful rocks.
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20220823_091151Balloon-pod milk vetch

IMG_0090Golden-mantled ground squirrel taking in the views.

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IMG_0098Mt. Shasta over Mt. Eddy through the haze. I believe the lake below to the right is Big Marshy Lake.

IMG_0101Fireweed in the rocks.

IMG_0102Paintbrush

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IMG_0107A bit of water from a spring along the PCT.

IMG_0108The water was coming from somewhere up there.

20220823_093103Looking back along the PCT.

IMG_0117Snack time.

IMG_0121Caesar and Thompson Peak

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IMG_0130This northern flicker looks like its head is on backwards.

IMG_0138A little bit of burned forest near the pass.

IMG_0145More peaks in the heart of the Trinity Alps.

IMG_0146Caribou Mountain (post) on the right with Sawtooth Mountain over its shoulder.

IMG_0151The pass above Middle Boulder Lake.

IMG_0152Middle Boulder Lake is just visible beyond two smaller unnamed lakes.

There was no sign at the pass but a small cairn marked a trail to the right that led down past the lakes.
IMG_0154Middle Boulder Lake Trail at the pass.

IMG_0155The Middle Boulder Lake Trail traversing down the hillside.

IMG_0157A sulphur butterfly.

IMG_0158The trail stayed above the two unnamed lakes.

The trail grew faint as it passed through a series of meadows where little frogs were abundant.
IMG_0163The trees on the far hillside were burned in the 2021 fire.

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Approximately 0.6 miles from the pass we came to a cairn near a downed tree. A trail sign had been attached to the end of the tree marking the Boulder Tie Trail.
IMG_0174The cairn to the right of the downed tree.

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It took us a minute to identify the actual start of this trail which was in a wet meadow. There were a few small cairns that helped guide the way and we soon found ourselves on clear tread again.
20220823_104855This may be Autumn dwarf gentian

IMG_0183One of the more obvious cairns.

IMG_0185Butterfly on a seed head.

IMG_0189The tread getting clearer.

IMG_0190Middle Boulder Lake

IMG_0191Back on good tread.

As we were traversing a sagebrush hillside Heather started repeating something behind me. She was saying “buck” but that isn’t what I heard and thought something bad had happened to her.
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The vegetation was tall enough that he was hard to pick out but when he raised up we got some decent views.
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IMG_0213Orange agoseris

After a mile and a half on this trail we climbed to a saddle overlooking East Boulder Lake.
IMG_0221Passing through a bit of forest before climbing to the saddle.

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From the saddle we spotted a hiker making his way along the lake. He spotted us as we were descending and waited for us to come down. We lost the trail again as we descended and simply hiked cross country through the sagebrush to the East Boulder Trail. The waiting hiker asked us about the loop and how hard it was to follow. He was a local that had been to the lake and the pass above several times but had never attempted the loop. After getting some information from us and taking photos of our paper map he was considering giving the loop a go. We went our separate ways, recrossed the dam, and returned to the trailhead.
IMG_0232Approaching the dam.

IMG_0233Fish in East Boulder Creek.

IMG_0236Descending near the waterfall.

IMG_0239An aster or fleabane.

IMG_0243Butterfly

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IMG_0248Woodpecker

While Sullivan listed the hike as 9.8 miles our GPS only registered 9.6 miles with a total elevation gain just under 2000′.

We returned to Etna, showered, and then headed to Paystreak Brewing for dinner. We turned in fairly early in anticipation of our longest hike of the week the next day when we would be taking the PCT north from Carter Meadows Summit and heading into the Russian Wilderness. Happy Trails!

Flickr: East Boulder Lake

Categories
California Hiking Mt. Shasta Area Trip report

Mount Shasta Meadows – 08/22/2022

We had planned a five day backpacking trip in the Wallowas but then a red flag warning for the possibility of abundant lightning the first day followed by more chances of thunderstorms over then next two derailed those plans. That trip would have checked three more featured hikes from the remaining twenty one hikes on our to-do list from the Eastern Oregon area. With all twenty one of the those hikes being located in the NE corner of Oregon (15 in the Wallowas and 6 along Hells Canyon) there were no alternate plans we could look to in that area to continue making progress toward or 500 featured hikes goal (post) so we turned to the Southern Oregon & Northern California book instead. For that area we still had thirty one featured hikes left including five hikes in Northern California, one at Mt. Shasta and four near Carter Meadows Summit west of Callahan, CA. A clear forecast and no wildfire closures provided a green light so we booked a last minute room at the Etna Motel in Etna, CA and once again headed south this year.

When we reached Yreka, CA instead of taking Highway 3 to Etna we stayed on Interstate 5 and continued south to Mt. Shasta and made our way to the Upper Panther Meadows Trailhead. We had tried to do the hike here in late July 2017 but a late snow melt that year had kept the gate to this trailhead closed so we had hiked from Bunny Flat instead (post).
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IMG_9690Lupine at the trailhead.

IMG_9687A line of smoke over the Castle Crags (post) and Mt. Eddy (post).

IMG_9691Castle Crags

From this trailhead we followed the Everitt Memorial Highway uphill a quarter mile to the South Gate Meadows Trailhead.
IMG_9698Green Butte and Mt. Shasta

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Here we hopped onto a rock lined trail and climbed a half mile to a pass where we entered the Mt. Shasta Wilderness.
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IMG_9704Common buckeye

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IMG_9721Red Butte from the pass.

IMG_9722Mount Eddy from the pass.

IMG_9724Heather standing at the wilderness boundary.

From the pass the trail descended 0.6 miles to a signed trail junction at The Gate below Red Butte.
IMG_9733A dry spring along the trail. Ideally we would have been doing this hike (and trip) in late July for more wildflowers but sometimes the circumstances dictate when and where we wind up.

IMG_9740Approaching The Gate.

IMG_9742Shastarama Point and Thumb Rock

IMG_9745Gray Butte

IMG_9747The trail junction near The Gate. The trail to the right would be our return route to make a loop through Panther Meadows, but for now we went left following the pointer for South Gate Meadows.

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We followed the trail downhill through boulders from Red Butte then into a forest that provided the first real shade of the hike.
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IMG_9759A paintbrush and aster.

IMG_9760Penstemon

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IMG_9763Some haze to the south but we could make out Lassen Peak which is one we rarely ever get to see.

IMG_9764Lassen Peak

Just under three quarters of a mile from The Gate we arrived at South Gate Meadows.
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IMG_9776Primrose monkeyflower

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From the meadows use trails head both up and downhill along South Gate Creek (aka Squaw Valley Creek). Sullivan showed a “monkeyflower spring” a half mile uphill and a “circular meadow” four tenths of a mile downhill. Not knowing when we might be back we decided to do both starting with the downhill first.
IMG_9787The use trail crossing the creek.

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IMG_9792In sight of the circular meadow.

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IMG_9798Marsh grass-of-Parnassus

IMG_9805Paintbrush

After a quick visit we headed back up to South Gate Meadows.
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IMG_9807Back at the meadows.

We then took a use trail up along the eastern side of the creek which brought us to the spring.
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IMG_9816A pair of common buckeyes.

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IMG_9827Primrose monkeyflowers and paintbrush

20220822_125455_HDRNot the “monkeyflower” spring but a smaller one along the way up.

IMG_9834The “monkeyflower” spring.

IMG_9835A couple of monkeyflowers and a buckeye.

IMG_9837I climbed a bit above the spring to check out the view.

IMG_9839Heather arriving at the spring.

We took a break here and one at the little spring we’d passed on the way up and then headed back toward The Gate.
IMG_9852A Clark’s nutcracker also taking a break.

Two types of monkeyflower and bog St. John's wortTwo types of monkeyflower and bog St. John’s wort,

IMG_9860One last pass through South Gate Meadows.

IMG_9861Red Butte

Shasta knotweedShasta knotweed

IMG_9868Back at The Gate.

From The Gate we followed the pointer for Panther Meadows. This trail brought us through a barren landscape before climbing over some glaciated rock and entering a forest.
IMG_9874_stitchMt. Shasta from the trail.

IMG_9876Red Butte

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IMG_9880Glaciated rock.

IMG_9881Mt. Shasta and Sargents Ridge.

IMG_9883Into the forest.

IMG_9885The trail left the wilderness along the way.

Just over three quarters of a mile from The Gate we arrived at a junction with the Gray Butte Trail. We had considered taking this 0.9 mile detour but it was already 2:20pm and it was also fairly warm so we decided to skip it this time around.
IMG_9887The junction with Gray Butte behind the trees.

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From the junction the trail gradually descended a half mile to Panther Meadows.
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IMG_9894Another Clark’s nutcracker. They are boisterous birds and other than first thing in the morning we get a kick out of listening to them.

IMG_9895Stream flowing through the meadows.

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IMG_9899Gray Butte from Panther Meadows.

At a junction on the west side of the meadow near Panther Meadows Campground we followed a pointer for Upper Panther Meadow.
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We followed this trail just over a third of a mile uphill to another junction where we turned right and followed a path across the creek.
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We kept right for 0.2 miles to reach Panther Spring.
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After visiting the spring we backtracked a tenth of a mile and turned right for a third of a mile back to the Panther Meadows Trailhead to complete the loop.
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IMG_9928Picnic tables at the trailhead.

With the two side trips at South Gate Meadows and some other wandering the hike came to 7.4 miles with approximately 1900′ of elevation gain.

From the trailhead we drove to Etna and checked into our motel then made a quick run to Ray’s Food Place for some food for the week. It was a nice start to the vacation made even better when we saw that the Callahan Fire which had started on 20th just 6 miles east of Callahan had been fully contained at less than 10 acres. That one had the potential to do a lot of damage (and put a nix on the rest of our hikes). Our plan for the next day was to hike to East Boulder Lake as that was the closest to where the Callahan Fire was and therefore most likely to be closed if that fire were to spread but thankfully it sounded like that wasn’t going to happen. Happy Trails!

Flickr: Mount Shasta Meadows

Categories
California Hiking Klamath Mountains Siskiyou mountains Trip report

Siskiyou Wilderness Days 3 & 4 – Raspberry Lake and Black Butte Trail 07/03-04/2022

After the long hike to Devil’s Punchbowl the day before (post) we were looking forward to a shorter hike on Sunday and having time in the afternoon to relax around camp before hiking out on the 4th. Our goal on this day was Raspberry Lake which sits below Preston Peak, the highest peak in the Siskiyou Wilderness. It had started to cloud up the day before but it hadn’t rained. A layer of fog however had settled over the meadow in Youngs Valley by early morning.
IMG_6035Fog at 5:30am

We hadn’t heard the bear overnight but we were still on high alert keeping an eye out for it. In fact I was so focused on looking for black fur that I didn’t notice a buck near where our food was hung and when he jumped it startled me half to death because I was less than 10 yards away from it.
IMG_6039After he jumped he started to run off but quickly stopped to eat just a few yards later.

The fog was burning off quickly as we ate breakfast and we did not see the bear again that morning.
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IMG_6042Deer in the meadow.

IMG_6043Snail near our breakfast spot. It’s amazing how quickly these guys can get from one place to the next.

After breakfast we secured our food and garbage and headed for the lake. We walked up the old road bed to the junction with the Raspberry Lake Trail and turned right.
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We followed the trail/old roadbed past the junction with the Poker Flat Trail which we had come down on our first day (post) and continued on the road for 2.5 miles to a fork near the former Cyclone Gap chrome mine.
IMG_6056Lupine and beargrass along the road.

IMG_6059Lupine

IMG_6060Beargrass

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IMG_6073Waterfall on cliffs below El Capitan.

IMG_6075Waterleaf

IMG_6078Stream crossing.

IMG_6080At times the old roadbed looked like you could drive on it but other times it looked like this.

IMG_6082Small meadow along the trail.

IMG_6089Western azalea

IMG_6091The clouds burned off quickly.

IMG_6100Penstemon

At the 1.5 mile mark we detoured slightly to a view point overlooking Youngs Valley near a ridge end.
IMG_6102Youngs Peak with the meadow barely visible to the right below.

IMG_6104Rocky Knob to the left.

As we rounded the ridge we got a good view up Clear Creek to Bear Mountain where we had been the day before visiting Devil’s Punchbowl.
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We ignored a side trail for Cyclone Gap shortly after rounding the ridge but when we reached the fork at the 2.5 mile mark we did detour to the right along a level roadbed to visit some of the mine ruins.
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IMG_6118Sign at the Cyclone Gap junction.

IMG_6124Back into the 2018 Natchez fire scar.

IMG_6127Preston Peak

IMG_6129Paintbrush along the trail.

IMG_6135Streambank bird’s-foot trefoil

IMG_6142Musk monkeyflower

IMG_6145Raspberry Lake Trail to the left.

IMG_6146Ruins from the chrome mine.

IMG_6147More mine ruins on the hillside below.

We returned to the trail and followed it uphill above the old mine where the roadbed ended. The trail became narrow and rocky as it rounded another ridge end. Here we ran into the couple that we had spoken with at Doe Creek the day before. They had hiked up the Rattlesnake Meadow Trail which they reported was quite overgrown and then followed a ridge cross-country up to Raspberry Lake which they did not recommend.
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IMG_6155Nuttall’s sandwort

IMG_6156Bear Mountain and Rocky Knob.

IMG_6157Chipmunk

IMG_6160Getting closer to Preston Peak.

IMG_6162Ragwort

IMG_6167Small stream crossing.

IMG_6169A short steep rocky section where cairns were helpful.

IMG_6170Rounding another ridge with Preston Peak on the left and Bear Mountain to the right.

IMG_6172First view of Raspberry Lake in the trees below to the right.

A series of steep switchbacks led down to the lake.
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There were a few tents set up around the lake so we didn’t do a lot of exploring. Our timing wasn’t great as the Sun was positioned slightly to the left behind the lake which still lay in the mountains shadow which made it very difficult to photograph.
IMG_6194Big rock along the shore.

It was a nice lake but not nearly as dramatic as Devil’s Punchbowl had been. After a short break here we headed back looking forward to some extra rest and relaxation at the less crowded meadow in Youngs Valley.
IMG_6200Bell catchfly

IMG_6205Douglas’ Dustymaidens

IMG_6225El Capitan on the right. To the left I think that is Bear Cub with Polar Bear Mountain behind.

IMG_6232Western azalea

IMG_6242This squirrel gave us a stern talking to.

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IMG_6214Western tanager pair

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IMG_6247Twin Peaks

IMG_6264We believe this is what Sullivan shows as Slow Echo Camp on his map. We wondered what the stones in the foreground had been a part of?

The waterfall we had seen was near the camp and I set off into the brush to see if I could get a better view. It partially worked.
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Near the other small campsite we encountered a buck which may have been the same one that startled me back near our camp earlier based on how comfortable he was with us being there.
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When we arrived back at the meadow our neighbors had moved on but we did run into a grouse.
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The hike to the lake and back came in at 8 miles even with approximately 1750′ of elevation gain.

Day 3 Track in Green

After putting things away we set up our lightweight chairs near the meadow and watched the ever changing clouds. It wasn’t long before we noticed other hikers/backpackers across the meadow following the road down from the Youngs Valley Trailhead. We also spotted Buster (the name we’d given the bear) lumbering through the meadow again.
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In fact Buster passed through the meadow twice going in the same direction which led us to wonder if there was more than one Buster in the area (or a glitch in the Matrix). The bear didn’t seem to care that another group had set up a tent on the opposite side of the meadow and was similarly unimpressed when another couple arrived with their dog. We heard the dog bark and wondered if it was at Buster and when the couple passed by us on their way to finding a site they confirmed that the dog was barking at the bear and that it didn’t phase it one bit. They also mentioned that a friend of theirs had stayed there the week before and seen the bear around. Fortunately it appeared that everyone had proper bear proof systems in place, i.e. bear canisters, ursacks and/or bag hanging systems. Hopefully people continue to be responsible because it only takes one careless person leaving food out or in their tent for the bear to figure out that people have food. So far even though it wasn’t nearly as wary of people as most black bears are it didn’t show any signs of equating people with having food (not being food, those are grizzly bears lol). If that happens it typically means the bear will be put down.

IMG_6306This butterfly did discover people=salt.

IMG_6311Maybe a flycatcher of some sort near camp.

IMG_6319Common buckeye

IMG_6321Turkey vulture checking out the meadow.

We did do a little exploring in the area and found a few flowers nearby that we’d missed the day before.
20220703_153845White rush lily

IMG_6326Ginger

20220703_181554Snow plant

Both of the new groups of backpackers had dogs but aside from the initial barking at Buster we didn’t hear either of them again which we took to mean the bear kept its distance overnight. In the morning we got an extra early start for our hike out managing to have coffee and breakfast, pack up and still be on the trail by 6:15am.
IMG_6332Another low cloud morning.

IMG_6333Heading out

We followed the old road bed past the Raspberry Lake Trail junction half a mile to another trail junction, this one with the Black Butte Trail.
IMG_6337Passing around the meadow, we didn’t see Buster this morning.

IMG_6341Black Butte Trail junction.

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We turned right onto this trail which was also an old road bed and followed it a little over half a mile to the East Fork Illinois River.
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IMG_6350Bear Cub under the clouds.

IMG_6353Vanilla leaf along the trail.

IMG_6357Jessica sticktight

IMG_6358The headwaters of the East Fork Illinois River are just up from the trail so the river isn’t much more than a trickle at the trail crossing.

On the other side of the river we ignored the East Fork Illinois Trail to the left and continued on the old road bed.
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IMG_6371The edge of the clouds to the NW.

IMG_6377Passing below Bear Cub.

IMG_6382Being an old road bed in unburt forest made for easy hiking.

Going into the weekend there had been a chance of showers both Sunday and Monday. Sunday had remained dry but today a light mist was falling and there were a couple of brief showers which were enough to prompt us to put the rain covers on our packs but not enough to don our rain gear.
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When we had made it to the north side of Bear Cub (Sullivan refers to it as Polar Bear Cub) we were momentarily confused by the number of trails our GPS units were showing. Sullivan’s map only showed an unmaintained use trail heading right toward the mountain while our paper Forest Service map didn’t show any other trails, but the GPS topo showed Sullivan’s user trail and another trail heading slightly downhill to the left. What we were seeing was the old roadbed curing right toward Bear Cub and a trail with cairns on both sides heading straight.
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The existence of the third trail on the GPS had us questioning whether the trail marked by cairns was the Black Butte Trail or the left most trail showing on the Garmin. After some debate we decided that it must be the Black Butte Trail and passed between the cairns. This turned out to be the right choice and we soon found ourselves climbing through the 2020 Slater fire scar.
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IMG_6391Swtichbacking toward Bear Cub.

IMG_6396Black Butte

We were a bit disappointed when we realized that to reach the junction with the Black Butte Tie Trail below Black Butte we had to lose about 100′ of elevation first.
IMG_6399Heading downhill so we could go up.

IMG_6402Creek crossing in the basin below Black Butte.

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IMG_6411Looking back into the clouds where we’d come from.

IMG_6412Steep climb up to the junction.

IMG_6413We made it back to the junction! Only 1.8 more miles to go.

We turned left at the junction, now following the route that we’d come in on from the Black Butte Trailhead on the first day. We had both convinced ourselves that this stretch would be mostly downhill, but we had been deceived.
IMG_6418Spirea

IMG_6419Pair of woodpeckers

IMG_6428Why is there more uphill?

IMG_6440Black Butte from the trailhead with Heather coming down the trail.

It was 5.6 miles from our camp to the trailhead but after some challenging hikes it felt harder than that. The nearly 1400′ of elevation gain didn’t help that, but it had been a great trip none the less.

Day 4 Track in blue

The most significant rain shower started as we were changing at the trailhead so the timing there was pretty good. The trip had been challenging but it was worth it to have the chance to experience a new area with such diverse plants and great scenery. The wildlife was a bonus although a little less bear would have been okay.

What wasn’t good was the low tire pressure light that came on almost immediately after starting our drive. We had the same light come on in June driving up to the Siskiyou Gap Trailhead (post) and taken the car to Les Schwab in Ashland for an air check. The two left side tires were just a little low then so they added some air and we were off. Today was the 4th though and the Les Schwab stores in Grants Pass (the closest to where we were) were closed for the holiday so we pulled into a gas station and checked the air at their self-serve station. The same two tires were again a little low so I topped them off and we drove home. The light was back Tuesday morning when I started my drive to work prompting a trip to Les Schwab in West Salem where they removed the tires and discovered a screw in the rear tire and a nail in the front. Luckily both were small leaks and repairable. Hopefully we’re done with that light for a long while now. Happy Trails!

Flickr: Raspberry Lake / Youngs Valley To Black Butte Trailhead