Categories
Hiking SW Washington Trip report Washington

Black Hole Falls – 06/04/2022

After our extended Memorial Day weekend of hiking in the Medford area we were looking forward to a poison oak free outing. While we didn’t come away from that trip with any physical repercussions from the plant it had gotten into our heads to the point where we were seeing it when we closed our eyes. As I said before I’m sure after a while people just get used to it but we weren’t anywhere near that point yet and while it is present in the Willamette Valley and parts of the Columbia Gorge it isn’t as abundant. On our schedule for this hike was a visit to Black Hole Falls along North Siouxon Creek. This was good timing as the forecast for the weekend was for rain showers which, barring heavy fog, wouldn’t negatively affect our experience here. Black Hole Falls is a hike featured in Matt Reeder’s “Off the Beaten Trail” 2nd edition guidebook which as the title suggests contains 55 (50 featured and 5 bonus) hikes that don’t usually see a lot of visitors. In most cases it isn’t because of poor road or trail conditions but there are more popular destinations nearby causing these hikes to be overlooked. In the case of Black Hole Falls the drive wasn’t the greatest but it also was nowhere near the worst we’d been on but it is also near the much more popular hike at Siouxon Creek (post). Note that the 2020 Big Hollow Fire affected the Siouxon Creek area (it didn’t reach North Siouxon Creek) which was reopened in August 2021.

We followed the Oregon Hikers Field Guide directions to the North Siouxon Trailhead which were also the direction provided by Google Maps as Reeder’s directions were no longer appeared accurate. (We don’t independently trust Google Maps as it sometimes tries to send you on roads that in no way shape or form appear passable.)
IMG_2182

The trail departing from this trailhead is actually the Mitchell Peak Trail which leads to the summit of Mount Mitchell (post) but that destination is over 9 miles away with the upper portion of the trail being unmaintained. The trail drops steeply for approximately 200′ from the trailhead before leveling out. The remainder of the hike was a series of ups and downs, none of which were too long nor too steep. There were a number of creek crossings some of which had footbridges (sometimes makeshift) or logs to cross on. Given the wet conditions we chose to ford a couple of the creeks instead of risking slipping off of a slick log. A reroute of the trail at mile 3.5 dropped below a pair of cascades where the previous tread had been washed out. At the 4.5 mile mark the trail forks with the right hand fork leading a quarter mile downhill to Black Hole Falls.
IMG_2186Dropping into the forest.

The forest along the trail was just what we’d needed with a lush green (poison oak free) under story where woodland wildflowers and mushrooms thrived. With no confusing junctions and very little blowdown along the trail we were able to fully relax and take in the surroundings.
IMG_2189

IMG_2194Anemone

IMG_2190Vanilla leaf

IMG_2197Baneberry

IMG_2198

IMG_2202

IMG_2204

IMG_2206Quite a few snails and slugs along the trail.

IMG_2211Starflower

IMG_2213

IMG_2214

IMG_2217

IMG_2220

IMG_2225

IMG_2230Some of the logs had had tiles and ropes placed on them to help avoid slipping.

IMG_2233Surprisingly this was the only rough-skinned newt we spotted all day.

IMG_2234Foam flower

IMG_2237Inside-out flower

IMG_2241There were some huge nursery logs in the forest here.

IMG_2243A good example of a makeshift crossing.

IMG_2244Most of the flowers were white or pale pink but this salmonberry blossom added a splash of bright color.

IMG_2245

A side trail near the 1.75 mile mark led down to a campsite near North Siouxon Creek.
IMG_2255

IMG_2259

IMG_2262

IMG_2265Violets

IMG_2268This was an interesting log/bridge.

IMG_2270Millipedes were everywhere but this one was a color we hadn’t seen before.

IMG_2275These were the ones we were seeing all over.

IMG_2272

IMG_2276The dismount was a little awkward but doable.

IMG_2281Star-flowered solmonseal catching a moment of sunlight.

IMG_2283Fairybells

IMG_2285Solomonseal

IMG_2286False lily of the valley

IMG_2288Moss and lichens

IMG_2289Spotted coralroot

IMG_2294

IMG_2298Bunchberry

IMG_2309Small fall along the trail.

IMG_2312Did I mention millipedes were everywhere?

IMG_2319

IMG_2325Another creek crossing.

IMG_2326

IMG_2329

The trail reroute at the 3.5 mile mark.
IMG_2330

IMG_2331The reroute

IMG_2334This was one of the log crossings that looked too slick and high to warrant an attempt so we forded here. The water was ankle deep and we crossed easily.

IMG_2335We forded just above the larger rocks in the middle of the creek.

IMG_2337The lower of the two cascades.

After fording the trail climbed up hill alongside a large tree that had fallen directly in the middle of the reroute. The presence of this tree didn’t cause too much trouble although it was wide enough that you could clamber over it except for near it’s top. I had wound up on the wrong side so I took the opportunity to follow the original trail to the old crossing before climbing up and around the root ball of the tree to rejoin Heather on the trail.
IMG_2343The upper cascade.

IMG_2344Looking across the old crossing you can see where some of the hillside was washed out.

IMG_2346Looking back at the trail from the creek. The large downed tree was the one that was too wide to climb over.

IMG_2347Most of the downed trees were like this although there was one that required ducking pretty low.

IMG_2348

IMG_2350We could hear the songs of wrens throughout the hike but only caught flitting glimpses of the little singers.

IMG_2351

IMG_2352

IMG_2354

IMG_2356Two of the footbridges were in a state like this. It held but we had to watch our step to not only avoid the holes but also the millipedes.

IMG_2360This was another ford/rock hop. There was a log serving as the bridge but it also looked slick. The rope in the picture was connected to the log and I almost didn’t see it (both times by).

IMG_2361

IMG_2362Deep pool near the crossing.

IMG_2363

IMG_2369

A post marked the side trail down to Black Hole Falls.
IMG_2372

We turned right and descended to Black Hole Falls which did not disappoint.
IMG_2375First view through the trees.

IMG_2376

IMG_2382The pool was a beautiful green.

IMG_2390More cascades and clear pools were located downstream.

IMG_2388Heather taking in the view.

IMG_2394Since I was already wet from the fords I waded out in the calf deep creek to get a different angle.

In addition to the beautiful waterfall and creek there was a unique feature in the basalt to the left of the falls that looked to us like a head with a wide open mouth.
IMG_2402

We stayed at the falls for a while before heading back. The forest was just as pretty on the return trip as it was on the way to falls. A light rain finally began to fall in the final mile or two of the hike which felt nice by then.
IMG_2406The right fork heading on toward Mount Mitchell.

20220604_104816A really long nursery log spanning across this whole depression.

IMG_2408Camouflaged mushrooms.

IMG_2409The only trillium that still had its petals.

IMG_2410

IMG_2412It looked like someone took a slice of this mushroom.

IMG_2416There weren’t too many views of North Siouxon Creek from the trail but this was a nice one.

IMG_2420Sour grass

IMG_2423Youth-on-age

IMG_2428Scouler’s corydalis

20220604_130059Candy flower

With some wandering down and along the creek and at the falls our day came in at 10.6 miles and approximately 2400′ of cumulative elevation gain.

The hike had lived up to being referred to as off the beaten trail as we didn’t encounter another hiker all day. We did have a pickup drive by while we were changing back at the car after our hike but it appeared to be someone from one of the logging companies checking the area. We had passed signs for active logging operations and saw equipment on the drive in. This turned out to be an excellent hike from start to finish and one that we will be keeping in mind to revisit in the future. Happy Trails!

Flickr: Black Hole Falls

4 replies on “Black Hole Falls – 06/04/2022”

Pretty! I’ve been on the Siouxon Creek trail but hadn’t heard of this one. Is the road passable for low clearance vehicles?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s