Categories
Hiking

Oregon Coast & Coast Range

Several years ago we set a goal for ourselves to hike all 500 featured hikes in William L. Sullivan’s “100 Hikes…” series of guidebooks (post). Last year we completed the first of these books covering the Central Oregon Cascades (post). We followed that up by completing a pair of books in 2021 starting with Sullivan’s “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Oregon Coast and Coast Range” 3rd edition. Up until the start of 2021 we had been intending to finish his 4th edition but the continued closure of the Salmonberry Railroad prompted us to revert to the earlier edition. That meant going from only needing to finish 5 hikes to 9 hikes but at least the 9 hikes were open and thus we were able to visit them. The last final featured hike happened to be featured hike #1 – Leadbetter Point (post) which we visited on 7/31/2021. Many of the featured hikes in this book are shorter hikes with some barely more than a half mile so we often did multiple hikes in a single day.

Generally speaking in order to check a hike off our list we need to have hiked a substantial portion of Sullivan’s described hike or visited the main attraction(s) he identifies for the hike. For 59 of the hikes we stuck to a nearly identical route to the one described in the book. For another 22 hikes we added to the hike, either following Sullivan’s “other options” or making it up on our own. Eighteen of the hikes were limited to the main attraction which typically involved hikes where there was an option for a shuttle from a second trailhead or as in the case of the Rogue River Trail there were options for multi-day backpacking trips. (We will get to more of the Rogue River Trail as we work through his Southern Oregon book.) Finally one hike, #86 Lower Rogue River, was cut very short due to trail damage. We may revisit that trail at a later date but we counted it as we went as far as we felt we could safely at the time.

The area covered by Sullivan in this book is unique in that it is the only area in which there are featured hikes in three states – Washington, Oregon, and California. It also contains the northern most featured hike the aforementioned Leadbetter Point. The area covered is a somewhat narrow strip running down the coastline from Leadbetter Point south to Redwoods National Park in California. A few hikes are located as far inland as the foothills of the Coast Range along the edge of the Willamette Valley.

Despite being a fairly narrow (approximately 60 miles east to west) area the hikes were quite varied from beach walks to mountain summits, sand dunes to temperate rain forests, and urban walks to the solitude of remote wilderness.

The area is home to several designated wilderness areas including the two areas that are off-limits to visitors, Oregon Islands and Three Arch Rocks. The areas open to visitors are the Drift Creek, Cummins Creek, Rock Creek, Devils Staircase, Grassy Knob, Copper-Salmon, Wild Rogue, and Kalmiopsis.

Two mountain ranges are home to several hikes. The Coast Range extends over 200 miles from the Oregon/Washington border south to the Middle Fork Coquille River. At the southern end of the Coast Range the Klamath Mountains begin extending south into California. The elevations for these hikes ranged from sea level to 4655′ atop Vulcan Peak in the Klamath Mountains (Mary’s Peak at 4097′ marked the high point in the Coast Range).

Lastly many of the hikes along the Oregon Coast follow the route of the Oregon Coast Trail.

Without further ado here is a list of the 100 featured hikes along with a photo (or two where two distinctly different hikes were included in the entry) from the 2009 3rd edition of “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Oregon Coast & Coast Range”.

#1 Leadbetter Point – Hiked 7/31/2021
Bay Loop Trail

#2 Long Beach – Hiked 9/11/2017
Discovery Trail

#3 North Head – Hiked 9/11/2017
North Head Lighthouse

#4 Cape Disappointment – Hiked 9/11/2017
Cape Disappointment Lighthouse

#5 Fort Columbia – Hiked 9/11/2017
Fort Columbia

#6 Clatsop Spit – Hiked 9/9/2017
Elk at Clatsop Spit

#7 Fort Stevens – Hiked 9/9/2017
Battery Russell

#8 Fort Clatsop – Hiked 1/10/2016
Fort Clatsop

#9 Astoria – Hiked 9/9/2017
Megler Bridge in Astoria

#10 Seaside Promenade – Hiked 9/12/2017
Seaside promanade

#11 Tillamook Head – Hiked 12/8/2013
Cold morning in Ecola State Park

#12 Cannon Beach – Hiked 9/10/2017
Haystack Rock

#13 Saddle Mountain – Hiked 5/31/2013 & 6/23/2018
Saddle Mountain Summit Trail

#14 Highway 26 Waysides – Hiked 6/23/2018
Four County PointFour County Point

Dooley Spur LoopSunset Rest Area

#15 Banks-Vernonia Railroad – Hiked – 4/10/2016 & 1/16/2021 (Also ran as a marathon in 2014.)
Buxton Trestle

#16 Cape Falcon – Hiked 6/22/2012 & 4/29/2017
Cape Falcon from the Arch Cape to Cape Falcon Trail

#17 Neahkahnie Mountain – Hiked 1/5/2014
Lunch on Neahkahnie Mountian

#18 Nehalem Bay – Hiked 1/1/2018
Inlet along Nehalem Bay

#19 Munson Falls – Hiked 5/30/2015
Munson Falls

#20 Bayocean Spit – Hiked 4/14/2013
Cape Meares from Bayocean Peninsula Park

#21 Cape Meares – Hiked 1/1/2018
Cape Meares Lighthouse

#22 Wilson River – Hiked 3/8/2014
Bridge Creek Falls

#23 Kings Mountain – Hiked 8/16/2010
Elk Mountain Summit

#24 Gales Creek – Hiked 2/15/2015
Gales Creek

#25 Hagg Lake – Hiked 9/13/2019
Henry Haag Lake

#26 Cape Lookout – Hiked 11/11/2011
Cape Lookout

#27 Pacific City – Hiked 10/8/2013
Haystack Rock and Cape Kiwanda

#28 Mount Hebo – Hiked 5/30/2011 & 5/30/2015
Mount Hebo Trail

#29 Niagara Falls – Hiked 2/12/2017
Niagara Falls

#30 Neskowin – Hiked 2/12/2017
Proposal Rock

#31 Harts Cove – Hiked 12/6/2014
Harts Cove and Chitwood Creeks waterfall

#32 Cascade Head – Hiked 8/8/2010, 6/25/2019, & 9/28/19 (Inland Trail)
View from the Cascade Head Trail

Cascade Head Rainforest TrailInland (Rainforest) Trail

#33 Baskett Slough Refuge – Hiked 7/11/2010, 5/3/2020 & 4/15/2021
Baskett Butte

#34 Valley of the Giants – Hiked 5/18/2020
Valley of the Giants

#35 Roads End – Hiked 3/6/2021
Roads End Beach

#36 Drift Creek Falls – Hiked 12/6/2014
Drift Creek Falls

#37 Salishan Spit – Hiked 8/1/2015
Salishan Spit

#38 Devil’s Punchbowl – Hiked 7/12/2012
Devi's Punchbowl

#39 Newport Lighthouses – Hiked 8/26/2017
Yaquina Head Lighthouse from the Salal Hill TrailYaquina Head

Yaquina Bay BridgeYaquina Bay

#40 South Beach – Hiked 8/4/2018
Estuary TrailEstuary Trail

Yaquina Head across the jettySouth Jetty

Mike Miller TrailMike Miller Trail

#41 Ona Beach and Seal Rock – Hiked 12/11/2017
Exposed rocks on Ona Beach

#42 Drift Creek North – Hiked 9/15/2010
Drift Creek

#43 Drift Creek South – Hiked 8/3/2019
Drift Creek

#44 Mary’s Peak – Hiked 2009 (day unknown), 6/1/2014, & 6/5/2021
South side of Mary's Peak summit

#45 Kings Valley – Hiked 6/1/2014
Fort Hoskins Historic ParkFort Hoskins

Bridge leading into the Beazell ForestBeazell Forest

#46 Peavy Arboretum – Hiked 2/19/2018
Section 36 Loop Trail

#47 Chip Ross Park & Dimple Hill – Hiked 12/18/2016 & 10/2/2021
Mary's Peak from Dimple Hill

#48 Finley Wildlife Refuge – Hiked 10/21/2017, 5/31/20, & 4/14/2021
Homer Campbell Boardwalk

#49 Alsea Falls – Hiked 12/19/2012
Alsea Falls

#50 Yachats – Hiked 12/5/2020
Pacific Ocean from the 804 Trail

#51 Cape Perpetua – HIked 9/15/2010, 2/17/2013, & 10/27/2018
View from Cape Perpetua

#52 Gwynn Creek – Hiked 2/17/2013
Cummins Creek Loop Trail

#53 Heceta Head – Hiked 12/11/2017
Heceta Head Lighthouse

#54 Baker Beach – Hiked 1/15/2017
Heading back toward Baker Beach Camp

#55 Sutton Creek – Hiked 2/20/2016
Sutton Creek

#56 Cape Mountain – Hiked 9/5/2011
Nelson Ridge Trail

#57 Pawn and Pioneer Trails – Hiked 5/13/2021
Interpretive sign along the Mapleton Hill Pioneer TrailPioneer Hill Trail

Pawn Old Growth TrailPawn Old Growth Trail

#58 Siuslaw Ridge Trails – Hiked 2/20/2016 & 11/20/2021
View from the summit of the Old Growth Ridge TrailOld Growth Ridge Trail

Clay Creek TrailClay Creek Trail

#59 Sweet Creek Falls – Hiked 2/20/2016
Sweet Creek Falls

#60 Kentucky Falls – Hiked 5/9/2015
Upper Kentucky Falls

#61 Honeyman Park – Hiked 12/8/2018
Dune in Jessie M. Honeyman State Park

#62 Siltcoos Lake – Hiked 12/8/2018
Siltcoos Lake

#63 Siltcoos River – Hiked 12/8/2018
Siltcoos River

#64 Taylor Dunes – Hiked 9/13/2018
Taylor Dunes Trail

#65 Oregon Dunes – Hiked 1/1/2015
View from Oregon Dunes day use area

#66 Tahkenitch Creek – Hiked 1/1/2015 & 9/16/2018
Tahkenitch Creek

#67 Tahkenitch Dunes – Hiked 1/1/2015
First look at Tahkenitch Dunes

#68 Lake Marie – Hiked 9/13/2018
Lake Marie

#69 Umpqua Dunes – Hiked 9/13/2018
Umpqua Dunes

#70 Golden and Silver Falls – Hiked 5/16/2021
Golden Falls

#71 Shore Acres – Hiked 5/15/2021
Simpson Reef

#72 South Slough Estuary – Hiked 5/15/2021
South Slough

#73 Fivemile Point – Hiked 5/13/2021
Heading south toward Fivemile Point

#74 Bullards Beach – Hiked 9/15/2018
Coquille River Lighthouse

#75 Bandon Islands – Hiked 9/14/2018
Bandon Islands

#76 New River – Hiked 9/14/2018
New River

#77 Floras Lake – Hiked 5/8/2017
Paintbrush and Blacklock Point

#78 Cape Blanco – Hiked 5/8/2017
Cape Blanco Lighthouse

#79 Port Orford Heads – Hiked 5/8/2017
Port Orford Heads State Park

#80 Humbug Mountain – Hiked 5/16/2016
View from the Humbug Mountain summit meadow

#81 Sisters Rock – Hiked 5/16/2016
Thistle at Sisters Rock State Park

#82 Otter Point – Hiked 5/16/2016
View north from Otter Point State Park

#83 Coquille River Falls – Hiked 5/6/2017
Coquille River FallsCoquille River Falls

Elk Creek FallsElk Creek Falls

#84 Hanging Rock – Hiked 5/7/2017
Hanging RockHanging Rock

#85 Rogue River Trail – Hiked 5/14/2021
Rogue River

#86 Lower Rogue River – Hiked 5/9/2017
Washout along the Lower Rogue River Trail

#87 Illinois River – Hiked 5/20/2016
Indigo Creek

#88 Shrader Old Growth Trail – Hiked 5/9/2017
Francis Shrader Old Growth TrailShrader Old Growth Trail

Oregon's largest known Myrtlewood TreeMyrtle Tree Trail

#89 Cape Sebastian – Hiked 5/18/2016
Hunters Island from the Oregon Coast Trail

#90 Boardman Park North – Hiked 5/21/2016

#91 Boardman Park South – Hiked 5/19/2016
Lupine

#92 Vulcan Lake – Hiked 5/17/2016
Vulcan LakeVulcan Lake

Little Vulcan Lake below Vulcan PeakVulcan Peak

#93 Redwood Nature Trail – Hiked 5/17/2016
Big redwood along the Redwood Nature Trail

#94 Wheeler Ridge Bomb Site – Hiked 5/19/2016
Viewing platform for the bomb crater

#95 Oregon Redwoods – Hiked 5/13/2021
Inside a redwood trunk

#96 Stout Grove – Hiked 10/25/2015
Stout Memorial Grove

#97 Boy Scout Tree – Hiked 10/25/2015
Boy Scout Tree

#98 Damnation Creek – Hiked 10/24/2014
On the rocky beach near Damnation Creek

#99 Hidden Beach – Hiked 5/11/2017
Hidden Beach

#100 Fern Canyon – Hiked 5/10/2017
Fern Canyon

With any luck the Salmonberry Railroad will be reopened in the not too distant future so we can say we’ve completed the 4th edition as well. In the meantime there are still other non-featured hikes to explore and trails to revisit. Happy Trails!

Categories
Hiking Year-end wrap up

The Hikes of 2021 – A Look Back

It’s hard to believe another year has passed but here we are once again looking back on 12 months worth of hikes. While 2021 was an improvement over 2020 in almost every way it still had its share of ups and downs including losing our remaining cat Hazel in June and my Grandmother in October. While the challenge of finding places to hike due to COVID in 2020 were no more, the same couldn’t be said for COVID itself and it seems like it will be around for awhile. Wildfires once again were a large factor in deciding on our destinations, another issue that doesn’t appear to be going away any time soon.

Despite these issues we had some great hikes in 2021. I slipped an extra three hikes in during the month of April to wind up hiking on 58 days for a total of 641.5 miles while Heather got 55 days in and 614.7 miles. Forty of the hikes were entirely new to us while only one, Tumalo Mountain (post), was an complete repeat. We had done that one over after failing to catch the sunrise on our first try and boy was it worth it.

Our first and final hikes of the year were on converted railroads.
Banks-Vernonia State TrailBanks-Vernonia State Trail in January. (post)

Row River TrailRow River Trail in December. (post)

Over the course of the year we managed to complete several of our long term hiking goals. A trip to Cottonwood Canyon State Park in May marked our first hike in Gilliam County which is the last of Oregon’s 36 counties that we had not hiked in.
John Day RiverJohn Day River from the Lost Corral Trail

Trips in June and July took us to the final four of the 46 designated wilderness areas (open to visitors) that we had yet to visit in Oregon. In all we spent twenty-one days hiking in 15 different designated wilderness areas.
Ninemile RidgeNinemile Ridge in the North Fork Umatilla Wilderness in June. (post)

Devil's StaircaseDevil’s Staircase Wilderness in July. (post)

Owl Creek Trail entering the Black Canyon WildernessBlack Canyon Wilderness in July. (post)

Cairn on Monument RockMonument Rock Wilderness in July. (post)

By the end of July we had also completed our goal of hiking at least part of all 100 featured hikes in William L. Sullivan’s “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Oregon Coast” guidebook and in August we did the same with his “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Northwest Oregon and Southwest Washington” guidebook.
Bay Loop TrailLedbetter Point, the last of the hikes from the coast book. (post)

Badger LakeBadger Lake, the last hike from the northwestern book. (post)

Finishing those two books in addition to the central Cascades book we completed last year (post) left just the eastern and southern books. We checked off 14 featured hikes from the eastern book but were unfortunately unable to make any headway on the southern book due to the wildfires and persistent smoke that plagued southern Oregon and northern California for much of the hiking season.

Our northern most hike was at the aforementioned Ledbetter Point while our southern most hike was on the Oregon Redwoods Trail near the California border (post).
RedwoodsRedwoods

The western most hike was, as usual, along the Oregon Coast at Cape Argo State Park. (post)
Shell Island

This marked the first time 3 hikes from the same guidebook marked the furthest in different directions. For obvious reasons the eastern most hike was not from the coast book but from the eastern book. That was our hike on the Wenaha River Trail. (post)
Wenaha River Trail

As we have done the last couple of years we plan on putting together 2021 wildlife and wildflower posts but we’ll leave you with a few of our favorite sights throughout the year. For the most part the weather was good but wildfire smoke often impacted views.
Falls on Fall CreekFalls Creek – February

Cascade headCascade Head from God’s Thumb – March

Columbia River from Mitchell PointColumbia River from Mitchell Point – March

Mt. Hood and Columbia desert parsleyMt. Hood from Sevenmile Hill – March

Wildflowers at Dalles Mountain RanchDalles Mountain Ranch – April

Mt. AdamsMt. Adams from Grayback Mountain – May

Big tree down over the Pawn Old Growth TrailNavigating a downed tree along the Pawn Old Growth Trail – May

Rogue River TrailRogue River Trail – May

Golden FallsGolden Falls – May

Mt. HoodLenticular cloud over Mt. Hood from Surveyor’s Ridge – May

Whychus CanyonWhychus Canyon – May

Deschutes RiverDeschutes River – May

Whychus Creek OverlookWhychus Creek Overlook – May

Old growth noble fir standForest on Mary’s Peak – June

North Fork Umatilla RiverNorth Fork Umatilla River – June

Tower Mountain LookoutTower Mountain Lookout – June

Malheur River TrailMalheur River – June

Meadow along the Round Mountain TrailMeadow on Round Mountain – June

Mt. Jefferson from Santiam LakeSantiam Lake – July

Three Fingered Jack from Lower Berley LakeThree Fingered Jack from Lower Berley Lake (and a butterfly photobomb) – July

View from Subsitute PointThe Husband and Three Sisters from Substitute Point – July

Lookout and Round Mountain from the Ochoco Mountain TrailOchoco
Mountain Trail – July

Red SunRed Sun through wildfire smoke from the Monument Rock Wilderness – July

Canyon Mountain TrailCanyon Mountain Trail, Strawberry Mountain Wilderness – July

Fields Peak, Moore Mountain, Moon Mountain and Second PeakAldrich Mountains – July

Summit of Mount MitchellMt. Mitchell summit on a rare poor weather day – August

Mt. BachelorMt. Bachelor – August

View from Cottonwood CampCottonwood Camp, Big Indian Gorge in the Steens Mountain Wilderness – August

Wildhorse Lake TrailWildhorse Lake, Steens Mountain Wilderness – August

Sun behind a cloud over FrenchglenEvening at the Steens Mountain Resort – August

Little Blitzen GorgeLittle Blitzen Gorge – August

Riddle RanchRiddle Ranch – August

Sun through a line of wildfire smokeMorning in the Pueblo Mountains – August

Cairn along the Oregon Desert Trail in the Pueblo MountainsOregon Desert Trail, Pueblo Mountains – August

View from the Harmony TrailMt. St. Helens and Spirit Lake – August

Harmony FallsHarmony Falls – August

Loowit FallsLoowit Falls – August

Mt. St. Helens and Spirit Lake from Norway PassMt. St. Helens from Norway Pass – August

Mt. HoodMt. Hood from the PCT in the Indian Heaven Wilderness – September

Mt. Adams and Soda Peaks LakeMt. Adams and Soda Peaks Lake, Trapper Creek Wilderness – September

Jubilee LakeJubilee Lake – September

View from the Rough Fork TrailRough Fork Trail, Blue Mountains – September

Heritage Landing TrailHeritage Landing Trail, Deschutes River – September

Forest along the old roadbedMcDonald-Dunn Forest – October

Old Summit TrailCascade Mountains from the Mt. Jefferson Wilderness – October

Three Fingered Jack from Round LakeThree Fingered Jack from Round Lake – October

Mt. Hood and Lookout Mountain from Flag PointMt. Hood from the Flag Point Lookout

Mt. Hood from Lookout MountainMt. Hood from Lookout Mountain – October

214 TrailSilver Falls State Park – October

Laurel Hill Wagon ChuteLaurel Hill Wagon Chute – October

Off trail down Barlow RidgeBarlow Ridge, Mt. Hood Wilderness – October

Fern Ridge Wildlife AreaFern Ridge Wildlife Area – November

Here’s to an even better 2022. Happy New Year and Happy Trails!

Categories
Hiking Uncategorized

Central Oregon Cascades

Several years ago we set a goal for ourselves to hike all 500 featured hikes in William L. Sullivan’s “100 Hikes…” series of guidebooks (post). In 2020 we finished the first of his five guidebooks covering the Central Oregon Cascades. The achievement became bittersweet just 10 days after finishing the final featured hike at Erma Bell Lakes (post) when a freak windstorm caused the Lionshead and Beachie fires to explode burning a number of the trails that we had hiked on our journey to complete this goal. On the one hand we were fortunate enough to see these areas before they burned but it also means being more aware of what was lost, at least for the time being. The 2020 fires were not the first to burn trails that we’d hiked in the area, sometimes after and sometimes before. Fire is part of a forest’s cycle but their time frames take much longer than ours.

For this post we want to recap our journey to complete the 100 featured hikes while sharing a little of what the area looked like as we experienced it but first a little context. The area that Sullivan covers in the Central Cascades book, as well as his books for the other four areas, isn’t exactly easy to define. The vast majority of hikes could be fit into a rectangle starting with the upper left hand corner in Salem and extending east to Highway 97 then south to the junction of highways 97 & 58, then west until intersecting with a line due south from Salem. (The imaginary line follows I5 south until Cottage Grove where the freeway jogs SW.) That is over simplification though as that description overlaps at times with hikes described in the NW & Eastern books and excludes two featured hikes west of I5 and two east of Highway 97. The first snip below generally shows the described rectangle with the hiker symbols representing trailheads where we have started hikes (not limited to the featured hikes being discussed here). The second snip excludes any hikes that are included in one of the other areas that Sullivan covers.

The area is home to a variety of landscapes and ecosystems and contains at least parts of nine designated Wilderness Areas: Opal Creek, Bull of the Woods, Mt. Jefferson, Mt. Washington, Three Sisters, Menagerie, Middle Santiam, Waldo Lake, and Diamond Peak.

The area has been hit by a number of large fires since 2000. The map below covers the same approximate area as the second map above. The colored areas represent fires with yellow being 2000-2005, light orange 2006-10, dark orange 2011-14, and red 15-19.

Not included in the map above are the Green Ridge, Beachie or Lionshead Fires from 2020. The Green Ridge fire did not burn over any of the featured hikes (it did burn part of the Green Ridge Trail) but the Beachie and Lionshead Fires impacted a number of hikes in the Mt. Jefferson, Bull of the Woods and Opal Creek Wilderness and surrounding areas.

The map below includes the Riverside Fire (large fire to the north), Beachie and Lionshead (center left and right which combined after Labor Day) and the Green Ridge Fire (SE).

We were lucky enough to complete many of the hikes prior to them being burned but we also hiked a number post fire and have seen the recovery in process. I’ve done my best to note below if a featured hike has experienced fire since 2000 with the year and name of the fire.

After all of that here are the 100 featured hikes from the 2012 4th edition of “100 Hikes in the Central Oregon Cascades”:

#1 – Ankeny Wildlife Refuge-Hiked 4/6/2014
Ankeny Wildlife Refuge

#2 – Silver Fall-Hiked 2006, 7/30/2010 & 3/29/2018
Middle North FallsMiddle North Falls

#3 – Shellburg Falls-Hiked 5/23/2011
Burned-2020 Beachie Fire
Shellburg FallsShellburg Falls

#4 – Little North Santiam-Hiked 4/5/2012
Burned-2020 Beachie Fire
Snow on the Little North Santaim River

#5 – Henline Falls & Henline Mountain 7/27/2009 & 6/14/2020
Burned-2020 Beachie Fire
Henline FallsHenline Falls

#6 – Opal Creek 7/4/2010, 7/4/2012, 6/21/2014 & 7/24/2019
Burned-2020 Beachie Fire
Jawbone FlatsJawbone Flats

#7 – Dome Rock and Tumble Lake 7/18/2010
Burned-2020 Beachie Fire
Tumble LakeTumble Lake from Dome Rock

#8 – Battle Ax and Twin Lakes 9/20/2014
Olallie Butte and Mt. Jefferson with Elk Lake belowMt. Jefferson from Battle Ax

#9 – Stahlman Point 5/6/2013
Burned 2020 Beachie Fire
View from Stahlman PointView from Stahlman Point

#10 – Coffin Mountain Lookout 8/2/2013 & 7/4/2016
Coffin Mountain Lookout with the Three Sisters and The Husband beyond

#11 – Three Pyramids 7/18/2020
Meadow along the Pyramids TrailMeadow below the Three Pyramids

#12 – Crescent Mt. 7/6/2014
Beargrass meadow along the Crescent Mountain TrailBeargrass on Crescent Mountain

#13 – Browder Ridge 9/9/2012 & 7/4/2018
Mt. JeffersonMt. Jefferson from Browder Ridge

#14 – Echo Basin and Fish Lake 6/19/2020
Echo Basin TrailBoardwalk in Echo Basin

#15 – Iron Mt. 7/25/2010 & 7/4/2014
Iron Mountain from the Cone Peak MeadowIron Mountain from the trail.

#16 – House Rock 11/8/2014
House Rock

#17 – Rooster Rock 6/12/2016
Rooster Rock from a viewpoint in the Menagerie Wilderness

#18 – Cascadia State Park 6/12/2016
Soda Creek FallsSoda Creek Falls

#19 – Crabtree Lake 9/7/2019
Crabtree Lake

#20 – McDowell Creek Park 2/16/2014
Majestic FallsMajestic Falls

#21 – South Breitenbush Gorge 5/11/2013
Burned 2020 Lionshead Fire
Roaring CreekRoaring Creek

#22 – Jefferson Park 9/23/2011, 10/13/2014, & 8/8/2015
Burned partly in 2017 Whitewater and rest in 2020 Lionshead Fire
Mt. Jefferson from Jefferson ParkMt. Jefferson

#23 – Pamelia Lake 9/19/2013 & 9/8/2018
Pamelia Lake

#24 – Marion Lake 10/3/2014 & 9/10/2016
Burned 2002 Mt. Marion, 2003 B&B Complex, 2006 Puzzle, 2015 208SRZ Marion
Three Fingered Jack from Marion LakeThree Fingered Jack from Marion Lake

#25 – Duffy Lake 7/28/2010
Burned 2002 Mt. Marion, 2003 B&B Complex
Mowich Lake and Duffy ButteMowich Lake and Duffy Butte from Red Butte

#26 – Three Fingered Jack 10/13/2012
Burned 2003 B&B Complex
Three Fingered Jack

#27 – Canyon Creek Meadows 7/28/2013
Burned 2003 B&B Complex
The trail aheadThree Fingered Jack

#28 – Carl Lake 9/1/2018
Burned 2003, B&B Complex, 2006 Puzzle
Carl Lake

#29 – Metolius River 7/23/2012
Wizard FallsWizard Falls

#30 – Black Butte 10/13/2013 & 5/28/2018
Burned 2009 Black Butte II
Cupola style lookout on Black Butte

#31 – Alder Springs 8/3/2011
Deschutes RiverDeschutes River

#32 – Scout Camp Trail 5/1/2016
Balsamroot hillside

#33 – Steelhead Falls 5/1/2016
Steelhead Falls

#34 – Smith Rock 7/14/2006, 7/13/2011 & 6/5/2015
Monkey FaceMonkey Face

#35 – Shevlin Park 8/5/2011
Hixson Crossing Covered BridgeHixson Crossing Covered Bridge

#36 – Tumalo Falls 9/27/2014
Tumalo Falls

#37 – Dillon & Benham Falls 8/1/2013
Benham FallsBenham Falls

#38 – Lava Cast Forest and Lava River Cave 5/28/2017
Newberry Crater from the Lava Cast Forest

#39 – Fall River 9/16/2015
Fall River

#40 – LaPine State Park 9/16/2015
Deschutes RiverDeschutes River

#41 – Poxy Falls and Linton Lake 5/3/2014(Proxy Falls) & 6/25/2017(Linton Lake)
Burned (Linton Falls) 2017 Separation Fire
Proxy FallsProxy Falls

#42 – Obsidian Trail 10/14/2012
Burned (tiny portion of trail) 2017 Separation Fire
Obsidian FallsObsidian Falls

#43 – Four-in-one-Cone 10/14/2012 & 8/14/2019
View from Four-in-one ConeView from Four-in-One-Cone

#44 – Benson Lake 10/14/2012 & 8/30/2014
Burned (small section of longer loop trail) 2010 Scott Mt. Fire
Benson Lake

#45 – Hand Lake Shelter 8/30/2014
Hand Lake Shelter

#46 – Little Belknap Crater 9/14/2015
Mt. Washington, Three Fingered Jack, and Mt. Jefferson from Little Belknap CraterMt. Washington, Three Fingered Jack, and Mt. Jefferson from Little Belknap Crater

#47 – Matthieu Lakes 7/29/2013
Burned 2017 Milli Fire
South Matthieu LakeNorth Sister from South Matthieu Lake

#48 – Black Crater 10/1/2016
Burned 2017 Milli Fire
Remanants of the lookout tower on Black CraterFormer lookout site on Black Crater.

#49 – Chambers Lakes 8/26/2014
Burned 2012 Pole Creek Fire
South Sister from Camp LakeSouth Sister from Camp Lake

#50 – Park Meadow 8/27/2014
Burned 2012 Pole Creek Fire
Middle and North Sister beyond Golden LakeMiddle and North Sister from Golden Lake

#51 – Tam McArthur Rim 8/31/2013
Broken Top and Broken HandBroken Top and Broken Hand from Tam McArthur Ridge

#52 – Tumalo Mt. 9/27/2014
Trees near the summit of Tumalo MountainTrees near the summit of Tumalo Mountain.

#53 – Todd Lake and Broken Top 8/23/2014
Broken Top from No Name LakeBroken Top from No Name Lake

#54 – Sparks Lake 10/1/2014
South Sister from Sparks LakeSouth Sister from Sparks Lake

#55 – Green Lakes via Fall Creek 9/15/2015
The third Green LakeThe third Green Lake

#56 – Moraine Lake and South Sister 9/1/2013
View from the South SisterLooking north from the South Sister.

#57 – Sisters Mirror Lake 9/19/2015
South Sister from Sisters Mirror LakeSouth Sister from Sisters Mirror Lake

#58 – Horse Lake 8/4/2011
Horse LakeHorse Lake

#59 – Doris & Cliff Lakes 9/29/2014
Doris LakeDoris Lake

#60 – Clear Lake 6/15/2014
Clear Lake

#61 – Sahalie & Koosah Falls 9/9/2012
Sahalie FallsSahalie Falls

#62 – Tamolitch Pool 5/27/2013
Tamolitch Pool

#63 – Rainbow Falls and Separation Lake 5/3/2014
Separation LakeSeparation Lake

#64 – Horsepasture Mt. 7/7/2018
South Sister and Mt. Bachelor from the Horsepasture Mountain TrailSouth Sister and Mt. Bachelor form Horsepasture Mountain.

#65 – Olallie Mt. 9/1/2019
Burned 2017 Olallie Lookout Fire (Lookout burned down winter 2019/20).
Olallie Mountain lookout

#66 – Lowder Mt. 9/1/2019
View from Lowder MountainView from Lowder Mountain.

#67 – Tidbits Mt. 6/29/2019
View from Tidbits MountainView from Tidbits Mountain.

#68 – Castle Rock 6/3/2017
Monkeyflower and pletritisMonkeyflower and plectritis on Castle Rock.

#69 – French Pete Creek 5/16/2015
Burned 2017 Rebel and 2018 Terwilliger Fires
French Pete Creek

#70 – Erma Bell Lakes 8/29/2020
Middle Erma Bell LakeMiddle Erma Bell Lake

#71 – Spencer Butte 2/9/2020
View from Spencer ButteFog over Eugene.

#72 – Mt. Pisgah 10/5/2019
Summit of Mt. PisgahSummit marker on Mt. Pisgah.

#73 – Shotgun Creek 2/9/2020
Shotgun Creek

#74 – Fall Creek 3/31/2013
Burned 2003 Clark and 2017 Jones Fires
Fall Creek

#75 – Mt. June 6/2/2013
Sawtooth TrailSawtooth Trail

#76 – Goodman Creek 11/10/2013
Small Falls on a branch of Goodman Creek

#77 – Patterson Mt. 5/5/2018
Lone Wolf MeadowLone Wolf Meadow

#78 – Tire Mt. 6/8/2014
Wildflowers along the Tire Mountain TrailWildflowers along the Tire Mt. Trail.

#79 – North Fork and Buffalo Rock 5/10/2020
Buaffalo Rock from the North Fork Willamette RiverBuffalo Rock from the North Fork Willamette River

#80 – Grasshopper Meadow 7/8/2017
Grasshopper Meadow

#81 – Blair Lake and Wall Creek 6/11/2015
Beargrass MeadowBeargrass meadow along the Blair Lake Trail.

#82 – Chuckle Springs 5/24/2020
Burned 2009 Tumblebug Complex
Indigo SpringsIndigo Springs (These springs have not burned.)

#83 – Spirt, Moon, and Pinard Falls 6/17/2020
Moon FallsMoon Falls

#84 – Brice Creek 5/5/2014
Upper Trestle Creek FallsUpper Trestle Creek Falls

#85 – Bohemia Mt. 8/15/2020
Bohemia Mountain

#86 – Eddeeleo Lakes 8/25/2018
Lower Eddeeleo LakeLower Eddeeleo Lake

#87 – Waldo Mt. 9/7/2013
Mt. Hood, Mt. Jefferson, Three Fingered Jack, Mt. Washington, The Three Sisters and Broken Top from Waldo MountainView from the Waldo Mountain Lookout.

#88 – Lillian Falls 8/30/2019
Lillian Falls

#89 – Fuji Mt. 10/6/2013
View from Fuji Mountain

#90 – South Waldo Lake 8/22/2015
Waldo Lake

#91 – The Twins 9/14/2019
View north from the south summit of The Twins

#92 – Rosary Lakes and Maiden Peak 9/3/2016
Pulpit Rock from Middle Rosary LakePulpit Rock from Middle Rosary Lake

#93 – Salt Creek Falls 7/4/2013
Salt Creek Falls

#94 – Midnight & Yoran Lakes 10/18/2014
Yoran LakeYoran Lake

#95 – Diamond View Lake 8/22/2020
Diamond Peak from Diamond View LakeDiamond Peak from Diamond View Lake

#96 – Fawn Lake 9/22/2018
Huckleberry BushesHuckleberry Bushes along Saddle Lake.

#97 – Divide Lake 8/24/2020
Notch LakeNotch Lake

#98 – Blue and Corrigan Lakes 8/23/2020
Diamond Peak from Corrigan LakeDiamond Peak from Corrigan Lake

#99 – Marie Lake and Diamond Peak 8/23/2020
Climbers trail to Diamond PeakDiamond Peak

#100 – Timpanogas Lake 9/17/2016
Sawtooth Mountain from Timpanogas LakeSawtooth Mountain from Timpanogas Lake

In addition to the 100 featured hikes we’ve manged to add other hikes from Sullivan’s additional hikes located in the back of his book. In doing so we have also completed all 100 featured hikes in the 3rd edition and are just 2 hikes short of completing the 5th edition as well. There were 14 hikes from the 3rd edition that were not featured hikes in the 4th edition while the 5th edition contains 12 new featured hikes from the 4th edition (Three of these had been featured hikes in the 3rd edition.) Even with all of the hikes we’ve done, and the areas lost to fire in 2020 there are a number of trails in the Central Cascades we have yet to explore. We will continue to work those into our plans as we strive to explore as many different places as possible while we can.

 

Happy Trails!

Scout Lake and Mt. Jefferson

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Hiking Uncategorized

Progress Report – 500 “Featured Hikes” – January, 2021 Update

In 2019 we posted about our goal to complete 500 “featured” hikes from William L. Sullivan’s “100 hikes” guidebook series. In 2020 we managed to complete the first of the books when we visited the Erma Bells Lakes (post) at the end of August. Ironically COVID-19, which caused so many issues for everyone this past year, was a big reason we were able to complete the Central Oregon Cascades book. Our original June vacation had already needed to be changed due to February flooding in the Blue Mountains but COVID kept us from taking a trip somewhere further away so we stayed home to do hikes closer by. In the end we wound up completing the 13 featured hikes that we had left from that book.

In all we were able to check off 37 featured hikes which included the 13 from the Central Cascades, 8 from NW Oregon, 7 from Eastern Oregon, and 9 from Southern Oregon. The one book that we didn’t make any headway with was the Oregon Coast. We did however visit Spruce Run and Lost Lake (post) which were two of the three hike options for the Lakes of the Coast Range (hike #12 4th edition).

Here is where we now stand at the end of 2020, having been on 401 of the 500 featured hikes:

100/100 – “100 Hikes in the Central Oregon Cascades” 4th Edition 2012

95/100 – “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Oregon Coast & Coast Range” 4th Edition 2016

94/100 – “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Northwest Oregon & Southwest Washington” 4th Edition 2018

60/100 – “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Eastern Oregon” 3rd Edition 2015

52/100 – “100 Hikes/Travel Guide Southern Oregon & Northern California” 4th Edition 2017

The Salmonberry Railroad Trail in the Coast Range continues to be closed which has caused us to rethink using Sullivan’s 4th edition of the coastal book and reverting to the 3rd edition. In that case we would only have completed 91 of the featured hikes but at least all 9 of those hikes are open and we actually have them all scheduled for the upcoming year.

In addition to possibly finishing one of the Oregon Coast books in 2021 the remaining hikes in the NW book are on the schedule for 2021 as well. We did push completion of the Southern book back a year to 2024 due to cancelling a September backpacking trip in the Sky Lakes Wilderness due to the massive wildfires in Oregon and California that month. The Eastern Oregon book is still on track to be completed by the end of 2025.

When I wrote in last year’s post “I’m sure there will be some twists and turns along the way, but eventually we hope to reach our goal.” I had no idea what 2020 had in store. We will continue to be flexible with our plans and make the most of the opportunities as they present themselves. Happy Trails!

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Hiking Uncategorized

Progress Report – 500 “Featured” Hikes

As we mentioned in our 2018 year end wrap-up post one of our long term hiking goals is to complete 500 “featured” hikes from William L. Sullivan’s “100 hikes” guidebook series. Sullivan has broken Oregon into five regions, the Coast & Coast range, Northwest Oregon, the Central Oregon Cascades, Southern Oregon, and Eastern Oregon. Each of the five books contains detailed information on 100 “featured” hikes in that area as well as 50 to over 100 listings of additional hikes. Although his focus is on Oregon there are hikes in Washington (coast and northwest), California (coast and southern), and one short hike in Idaho at Hells Canyon Dam in the eastern book.
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When we first decided to give hiking a try we picked up a single book (not by Sullivan) containing 280 hikes covering the entire State. Each hike contained just enough detail to let you know what you needed to know to get to the trail and get going. What it lacked was detailed information about the hike itself and any type of visual reference to assist with understanding the intended route. Due to the fact that the entries encompassed the entire State the number of hikes near us was somewhat limited. We used it for a couple of hikes then began looking for other options and that’s when we discovered Sullivan’s books.

Our first purchases were the coastal and central cascades books in 2010. Many of the hikes in these books were within an hour and half or less drive from Salem. We fell in love with the detailed descriptions that Sullivan provided and the hand drawn maps that went with each featured hike. Having the visual aid to refer to when reading the descriptions made things much easier for novice hikers like us to navigate the trails. In 2012 we added his books for the other three regions and soon after made it a goal to take at least one hike from each book every year.

We also had decided that we wanted to avoid doing the same trails over and over again and instead wanted to focus on visiting as many different places as possible. As time passed I began to toy with the idea of trying to finish all 100 featured hikes from the central cascades book. The hikes from that book were the closest to us and thus were nearly all within range for day-hikes. Thoughts then turned to the possibility of also completing the NW and maybe even the coast book, but with hikes as far away as the the redwoods in California that would require some extra time and planning.

After a couple of off-seasons of planning the next years hikes I started looking ahead to subsequent years. I had begun grouping the hikes that were too far way for day trips into possible long weekends or vacations. The thought of possibly doing all 500 featured hikes began to take hold and by the end of 2016 I had a preliminary outline that included them all. During our 2017-2018 off season I took the outline and completed a full 10 year schedule that incorporated all of the remaining featured hikes as well as some new ones from other sources and some of our favorites so far. With that initial schedule we would finally achieve our goal in 2027.

I have continued to rearrange the schedule and have since managed to bring the completion date up to September, 2025. Still a long ways off but closer. We are hoping to have the NW and Central Cascade books finished by the end of 2021 and the Coast by the end of 2022. With some luck the Southern book will follow in 2023 leaving the eastern book, and more specifically the numerous hikes in the Wallowa Mountains for last.

There are a couple of issues that we are dealing with. One is never knowing until the time comes if the hikes we are planning will be accessible or if weather, forest fires, or some other unforeseen obstacle will deny us a visit. Mount Ireland in the Blue Mountains near Sumpter is a great example. Snow kept us from this hike in 2017 when we spent a vacation in Sumpter (post) so we put it on the schedule again in conjunction with a backpacking trip in the Elkhorns in 2018. A lightning storm canceled that plan (post) and so now it has been add as stop on the way to Hells Canyon in 2022.

An even more complicated issue with this particular goal is that Sullivan regularly updated his books, releasing new editions every 5 or so years which inevitably contain a different 100 featured hikes. In between editions there are often reprints where there can also be changes to the featured hikes. This happens for numerous reasons such as forest fires burning over the area, landslides closing trails, access being cut off by private land owners, or he simply found what he felt was a more worthy featured hike. These changes have left us questioning exactly how to measure our goal. We know it is to do “500 featured hikes” but what 500?

The answer isn’t all that simple. For instance attempting to finish all 100 hikes from the 2011 third edition of “100 Hikes in Northwest Oregon & Southwest Washington” would mean hiking Mt. Mitchell (hike 21) but a private timber company closed access to the trail several years ago and the hike is no longer a featured hike in Sullivan’s books.

Looking to the most recent version of the books is also problematic, especially in regards to the southern and eastern books where the addition of a single hike in a remote area that we had already been to would require another long trip for that lone hike.

One possible way around this is to count any hike from an area that is/was a featured hike in any of the versions of the book. We are reluctant to do this though for two reasons. First there are a small number of hikes that have been featured hikes at one time in both the central and eastern books, so those could be double counted. If not then we’d have to decide which area to place them in. The biggest reason that we hesitate to go this route though is admittedly a bit shallow. It would most likely mean not having a single book that we could point to and say we had been on each of the featured hikes in it.

In the end I think we will wind up attempting to complete any single version of each area. It may be the most current or the oldest we own, or possibly something in between. Currently we are operating based on the most recent versions that we own save for the NW. The books we are currently using are:
“100 Hikes/Travel Guide Oregon Coast & Coast Range” Fourth Edition 2016
“100 Hikes in the Central Oregon Cascades” Fourth Edition 2012
“100 Hikes/Travel Guide Southern Oregon & Norther California” Fourth Edition 2017
“100 Hikes/Travel Guide Eastern Oregon” Third Edition 2015

For “100 Hikes in Northwest Oregon & Southwest Washington” we still only have the 2011 third edition but plan on picking up a new edition this April and are basing our progress off of the featured hikes to be contained in it.

With those books as the basis we currently stand at having done at least part of 335 of the 500 featured hikes. A caveat here is that for some of the hikes we have only completed a portion of the hike Sullivan describes either due to a trail being impassable (Lower Rogue River in 2017) or because we’ve combined more than one hike in a longer trip. In the case of the latter we are visiting most of the highlights but aren’t taking the same trail to them as described in the book.

A breakdown of the 335 hikes we’ve checked off is below.

Coast 89/100
Central 81/100
NW 72/100
Southern 42/100
Eastern 51/100

If we were to look at our earlier editions of the Central and NW books those numbers would jump to 84 & 78 respectively but as was mentioned before there are hikes in those that may no longer be possible.

Lastly applying the “featured hike in any version” criteria would put the total number at 365* with the coast and central regions at 93 apiece, NW at 81, southern at 45, and eastern at 53. *This includes a double counting of 5 featured hikes that moved between the eastern and central books so the number really should be 360.

No matter what criteria we apply we still have a couple of years to go before we finish anything so we have some time to mull it over. We’d be interested to hear from others which way they would go or if there is another idea out there we haven’t thought of yet so please comment below.

The one thing that we do know is that we can’t finish anything without visiting more trails. Our 2019 list includes 32 more featured hikes, 8 each from the NW and central books, 4 from the southern, and 12 from the eastern. We could fit a few more in, but finishing the 500 isn’t our only goal. Another goal is continuing to visit different areas in the Pacific Northwest so there are trips to places like the South Warner Wilderness in California, and North Cascades National Park in Washington sprinkled throughout the schedule. The possibilities seem just about endless.

Happy Trails!